Local and Seasonal food

Water Chestnuts How to consume tender water chestnuts


Water Chestnuts – how to consume them

NUTRITION Evidence Based 5 Surprising Benefits of Water Chestnuts (Plus How to Use Them) Written by Ryan Raman, MS, RD on April 20, 2018

Despite being called chestnuts, water chestnuts are not nuts at all. They are aquatic tuber vegetables that grow in marshes, ponds, paddy fields and shallow lakes. Water chestnuts are native to Southeast Asia, Southern China, Taiwan, Australia, Africa and many islands in the Indian and Pacific oceans. They are harvested when the corm, or bulb, turns a dark brown color. They have a crisp, white flesh that can be enjoyed raw or cooked and are a common addition to Asian dishes such as stir-fries, chop suey, curries and salads Water chestnuts are very nutritious and contain high amounts of fiber, potassium, manganese, copper, vitamin B6 and riboflavin. Most of their calories come from carbs. Water chestnuts are a great source of the antioxidants ferulic acid, gallocatechin gallate, epicatechin gallate and catechin gallate. These antioxidants can help the body combat oxidative stress, which is linked to many chronic diseases. Also known as Water Caltrop, Paniphal, Singhara

Eaten raw

Wash, peel and eat raw. Delicious, crunchy.

Boiled

Wash, cut off the stems and boil 15 minutes. Drain, cool, peel and eat as a delightful healthy nutritious snack

Sauteed Water chestnuts

1 medium onion, chopped ½ tsp. chilli powder 4 flakes garlic, chopped, 1” pc ginger, copped 1 tbsp. coriander leaves, chopped ½ tsp. salt 1 tbsp. lemon juice Optional: 1 tbsp. green chutney sauce, 1 tbsp. sweet chutney sauce or Schezwan sauce or combination of soy sauce and tomato ketchup 1 tbsp. each. Etc.

Wash and peel the water chestnuts and immerse in water till required. Add 1 tbsp. oil to a pan and stir fry for 10 minutes. Drain and remove. Add 1 tbsp. oil to the pan and sautee the chopped ginger garlic for a minute, then add the chopped onion and sautee till saoft. Add the chilli powder, green chutney and sweet chutney and salt and 2 t 3 tbsp. water and add the chestnuts and cook till the moisture dries and the sauce thickens. Sqyeeze over the lemon and garnish with coriander leaves. Serve as an accompaniment with any main meal or as a starter! Absolutely delicious!!

Drumstick Moringa Fruit Pods How to clean, cook and eat them in a simple yet delicious vegetable


Drumstick Vegetable, Sangho Tel Piyav

The healthy, nutritious drumstick (moringa) (sangho) fruit pods

Drumstick pods and leaves are a storehouse of essential nutrients, whereas the leaves are the most nutrient part of the plant and one of the finest sources of calcium, iron, zinc, selenium and magnesium.  Fresh pods and seeds are a great source of oleic acid, a healthy fatty acid which is known to promote heart health. Moringa leaves is unique among all the greens as it is heaped with a good amount of protein about 9.8 gram of protein per 100 grams. Dry powdered leaves are an amazing source of good quality essential amino acids.

The rich culinary tradition of our country has helped us to relish and taste several types of vegetables and fruits thereby derive out the umpteen health benefits. One such amazing vegetable that is greatly valued and earns our interest is drumstick or moringa oleifera.

Moringa obtains its name from the Tamil word, murungai, denotes twisted pod. This humble vegetable is used extensively in Indian culinary dishes for more than a hundred years. Be it delectable sambhar or avail, or any meat curry, soups, pickles etc., drumstick renders its unique flavour to the dishes.

Source: Netmeds.com

Ingredients

  • 6 Drumsticks
  • 5 flakes garlic
  • 1 medium onion
  • 2 tbs. coconut oil
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • Salt to taste
  • 4 tbsp. fresh coconut

Method

Cut the head and tail of the drumstick and cut into 2 to 4” segments, removing the skin as far as possible keeping the segment intact ensue it does not disintegrate. Discard the head, tail and the skin.  Wash and drain the cleaned drumstick pieces.  Slice the onion and peel and crush the garlic. Heat a pan, add 2 tbsp. coconut oil, when hot add 1 tsp. mustard seed and allow to pop, then add crushed garlic flakes. Saute for a minute and add the sliced onion and fry thill soft and translucent.  Add the drumsticks and toss to cost with oil.  Add a cup of water, ½ tsp. salt or to taste and bring to a boil.  Mix, cover and cook 10 minutes.  Stir in between.  When done, add the coconut, mix well and simmer 5 minutes.  Take off flame and serve hot as a side with any main meal.  To eat, hold the drumstick piece firmly with your teeth and pull with your fingers while extracting and consuming the pulp and the seeds inside the pod.  Chew the skin, if you wish, and discard.  Simply delicious!  The skin should not be ingested, only the pulp and tender seeds inside the pod.

Moringa Leaves Drumstick Leaves Stir Fry Vegetable


The new superfood – Moringa leaves, healthy, nutritious, excellent for gut health and for diabetics.  My mother never had to buy these leaves, they were always available in the home garden or the neighbourhood.  Thankfully these are now available worldwide at Asian stores, albeit at a price!

Ingredients

  • 2 Bunches Drumstick Leaves
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • 2 tbsp. coconut oil

Roast and grind to a coarse paste

  • 1 medium onion chopped
  • 2 flakes garlic
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 4 dry red chilies
  • ½ cup fresh or dessicaed coconut
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 to 2 tbsp. coconut oil

Method

Separate the leaves from the stems of the drumsticks and remove as much of the stems as possible although the small tender stems may be retained.  Soak in plenty of water for 10 minutes and rinse thoroughly changing the water atleast twice so that any dust etc. can come off.  Drain and set aside.

Drumstick Leaves Moringa Leaves Stir Fry vegetable

The new superfood – Moringa leaves, healthy, nutritious, excellent for gut health and for diabetics.  My mother never had to buy these leaves, they were always available in the home garden or the neighbourhood.  Thankfully these are now available worldwide at Asian stores, albeit at a price!

Ingredients

2 Bunches Drumstick Leaves

1 medium onion

1 tsp. mustard seeds

2 tbsp. coconut oil

Roast and grind to a coarse paste

1 medium onion chopped

2 flakes garlic

¼ tsp. turmeric powder

4 dry red chilies

½ cup fresh or dessicaed coconut

Salt to taste

1 to 2 tbsp. coconut oil

Method

Separate the leaves from the stems of the drumsticks and remove as much of the stems as possible although the small tender stems may be retained.  Soak in plenty of water for 10 minutes and rinse thoroughly changing the water atleast twice so that any dust etc. can come off.  Drain and set aside.

Heat a pan and add oil.  When hot add the red chilies, garlic and onion.  When light brown add the coconut, turmeric powder and salt and saute for 2 minutes till light brown and you get a nice roasted aroma.  Set aside to cool. Then grind to a coarse paste.

Slice the remaining onion.  Heat a pan and add oil, when hot add the mustard seeds, when they pop add the sliced onion and fry till translucent and soft.  Add the ground masala and saute 2 to 3 minutes adding the rinsed water from the jar. Add the drained drumstick leaves, mix and stir fry for 10 minutes.  Remove to a serving dish and serve hot.  The vegetable will have a slight crunch to it and a slight bitter taste so is very healthy and excellent for diabetics, is very nutritious and good for gut health due to it’s fibre content.  Some may want the leaves to be more tender, in this case add ¼ cup water and cook further 5 minutes.  Serve hot. 

Breadfruit Fry


Breadfruit is a staple food in many tropical regions. Most breadfruit varieties produce fruit throughout the year. Both ripe and unripe fruit have culinary uses; unripe breadfruit is cooked before consumption. Before being eaten, the fruit are roasted, baked, fried or boiled. When cooked, the taste of moderately ripe breadfruit is described as potato-like, or similar to freshly baked bread.  Breadfruit is exceptionally high in fibre and excellent for gut health!!

This recipe is similar to the Raw Banana Fry (Cooking with raw Bananas) that I

posted, but the method is different.  Here the breadfruit is marinated in the spices

and vinegar and then dipped in the batter prepared with the remaining marinade and

addition of flours.

Ingredients

  • 1 medium Breadfruit
  • 1 tsp. ginger garlic paste
  • 2 tbsp. Vinegar or Lemon juice, or to taste
  • ½ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. chilli powder or to taste
  • 1 cup water, approx.
  • ½ cup all purpose flour
  • ¼ cup rice flour
  • ¼ cup corn flour
  • ¼ tsp. soda bicarb (optional)
  • Salt to taste
  • Oil for frying

Method

Cut the end of the breadfruit and peel.  Cut into half, then fours.  Remove the pith and cut into 1/4 slices lengthwise or horizontally if its a large fruit.  Immerse in plenty of salted water, to prevent oxidation. 

In a separate bowl, mix the ginger garlic paste, chilli & turmeric powder, salt with the vinegar/lemon juice and water.  Add the breadfruit slices to this marinade and leave for 15 to 20 minutes.

Remove the breadfruit and set aside.  To the marinade add all purpose flour, rice flour, corn flour, soda bicarb and make a thick smooth paste.  If it’s too watery add some more of the flours.  Batter should coat the slices. Test salt and add if necessary.

Heat oil in a kadai or wide frying pan.  Dip the breadfruit in the batter to cover well. Deep fry in batches till crisp and golden on medium flame.  Drain on kitchen towel.    Serve as a side with a main meal or with tomato ketchup as a snack or appetizer.

P.S.: The same batter can be used to fry arbi, egg plant, zucchini, cauliflower, raw banana, potatoes, yam, mushrooms, etc.

Traditional way to make fried breadfruit is to just add some chilli powder, turmeric, salt and lemon juice or tamarind pulp to the slices and then shallow fry till cooked and lightly browned on both sides.

Radish Vegetable Mooli ki Sabji Rajasthani Style


Radish Vegetable Mooli Ki sabji

Radishes are a good source of antioxidants like catechin, pyrogallol, vanillic acid, and other phenolic compounds. These root vegetables also have a good amount of vitamin C, which acts as an antioxidant to protect your cells from damage. Some health benefits of radishes include: Reduced Risk for Diabetes, Enhanced Liver Function, Cardiovascular Improvement. Their nutrition Calcium, Vitamin C, Riboflavin, Niacin, Thiamine, Vitamin B6, Folate, Potassium, Iron, Manganese – Source: Wedmed

Ingredients

  • 2 medium white radish, with the leaves
  • ½ tsp. cumin seeds
  • ½ tsp. ajwain seeds (carom seeds)
  • 1 tsp. green chillie paste
  • 1 tsp. Ginger paste
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. coriander powder
  • 1 tsp. amchur powder
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • Salt to taste

Method

Clean the radish, immerse the leaves in salted water.  Use  only tender leaves. Chop the leaves fine.  Grate the radish or chop into thin slices.  Heat oil in a pan, add the cumin, ajwain, ginger & green chilli paste and saute for few seconds.

Add the chopped radish, turmeric powder, coriander powder, chilli powder, amchur and salt.  Mix well and cook for 10 minutes, adding a little water if necessary, till vegetable is tenderand moisture is almost absorbed.  Serve hot Serve hot with rotis for breakfast or dinner or as an accompaniment to any meal.

Zavla with Brinjal


Zavla (Dried Baby Shrimp) with Brinjal

Dried shrimp are shrimp that have been sun-dried and shrunk to a thumbnail size. They are used in many East Asian, Southeast Asian and South Asian cuisines, imparting a unique umami taste. A handful of shrimp is generally used for dishes. The flavors of this ingredient are released when allowed to simmer. javla: made from a tiny species of shrimp called karandi, which is typically dried head and shell on and consumed whole. (Wikipedia).

Dired shrimp is a unique way to add flavor to a array of dishes.  Baby shrimp are extremely tiny shrimps that appear translucent when dried.  They are tender and delicate but have a strong seafood taste.  Dried shrimp can be stored for prolonged periods compared to fresh shrimp and are widely stored and used during monsoon season in India and Asia.

Ingredients

  • 2 medium purple brinjals
  • 1 cup dried zavla (baby shrimp)
  • 3 spring onion with greens
  • ½ cup coriander leaves
  • 6 flakes garlic
  • 1” pc. Ginger
  • 4 green chillies
  • 2 tbps. Mixed masala (East Indian/Sunday Masala/Bafat powder available at grocers)
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • 1 tsp. Salt or to taste
  • 4 top 5 petals kokum (dried mangosteen)
  • 1 tbsp. tamarind pulp (use 2 tbsp. if kokum is not available)

Soak the dried zavla in plenty water for few minutes.  Wash well and squeeze out the water.  Set aside.  Wash the brinjals, cut off the stem and chop into cubes.  Chop the green onions, garlic and green chillies.  Heat oil in a vessel, add onion, ginger, garlic, chilies and kokum and saute for a minute.  When onion is translucent, add the masala powder, mix well and add the zavla and brinjal, add ½ cup water and bring to a boil.  Reduce flame and cook 10 minutes till brinjals are tender.  Add the chopped coriander leaves (save some for garnish) and salt.  Simmer 3 minutes.  Add the tamarind pulp and cook till oil surfaces.  Adjust seasoning.  Serve hot with chapatis or any bread of your choice or as side to any main mail.

Methi Mattar (Fenugreek green with Green Peas)


Green leafy vegetables – Methi leaves (fenugreek greens) have many health benefits.  They are full of fibre and nutrients, vitamin C & K in particular.

Always pick bunches that are fresh and bright green, avoid those that are yellow and wilted.  Avoid leaves that appear slimy, it is an indication of decay.  Methi is of two varieties, small leaves with tender white stems which is also called methi or menthya, venthiya, keerai and classified as micro-greens.  These are commonly used in the south of India and the Methi with Prawns is cooked as a delicacy and relished!  The Methi with larger leaves used here is an annual plant which is found in plenty in winter.  The leaves are pungent and bitter and the bitterness can be reduced by adding salt and squeezing out the water and rinsing before cooking.

Ingredients

  • 2 bunches methi (fenugreek greens) leaves
  • 1 cup green peas, shelled
  • ½ cup yogurt, beaten
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. red chilli powder
  • 2 medium onions, chopped finely or grated
  • 2 green chillies, chopped
  • 1 tsp. ginger paste
  • 1 tsp. garlic paste (or 1 tbsp. ginger garlic paste)
  • 1 tsp. cumin seeds
  • ¼ to ½ cup fresh cream
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste
  • 2 tbsp. oil

Remove methi leaves and tender stems from the stalks.  Clean and wash the leave and soak in water for 10 minutes.  Remove from the water and wash again till the the sand and dirt is removed.  Squeeze out the water and add 1 tsp. Salt and set aside for 15 minutes.  Squeeze out the water and rinse in clean water again.  This process removes the bitterness from the leaves.  If using fresh peas, clean, wash and boil in water.  Drain and keep aside.  Frozen peas can be used directly. 

Heat oil in a pan and add the cumin seeds.  When they crackle add the chopped onions and cook till light brown, stirring.  Add ginger garlic paste and saute 2 minutes.  Add the chopped methi leaves and green chillis and cook till moisture dries up.  Add the turmeric and chilli powder, mix.  Add the beaten yogurt and cook till oil surfaces.  Then add the green peas and one cup water, salt.  Bring to a boil, reduce flame and cook 10 minutes.  Stir in the fresh cream and mix well.  Simmer five minutes and serve hot garnished with chopped coriander leaves.

Methi Thepla


Methi Thepla  Gujarati Theplas

Theplas are synonymous with Gujarati breakfast!  A Versatile item as they can be  served even as tea-time snack or to satisfy a hunger pang!  For travellers it makes a great home-made food as it preserves well for long periods.  Theplas can make for quick and sumptuous wraps with your desired filling or simply have them with yogurt, pickle, garlic chutney, raita or any vegetable.

Instead of methi try using pumpkin (doodhi), zucchini or raddish with dried herbs, etc. as variations!!  However,  methi leaves (fenugreek greens) are found in plenty in winters and have many health benefits.  They are full of fibre and nutrients, vitamin C & K in particular.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups wheat flour
  • Pinch of asafoetida
  • 1 tsp. turmeric powder
  • ½ cup each of bajra (pearl millet) and gram (chick pea flour) flour
  • 1 tsp. chilli powder
  • 1 tsp.Salt
  • 4 green chillies
  • A small bunch fenugreek leaves
  • 3 tbsp. ghee

Remove the methi leaves and tender stems and place in a bowl.  Cover with water, add a tsp. of salt and let soak 10 minutes.  Rinse and drain the water.  Chop roughly and keep aside. Chop green chillies.  In the stand mixer bowl, add the ingredients from wheat flour to salt and sieve.  Add chopped  green chilies, fenugreek leaves and ghee, mix on speed 1 for 2 minutes.  Add water (1 to 1.5 cups) to form a stiff dough.  Add the water little at a time.  Divide the dough into approx.. 6 equal portions and roll out into round discs as thin as possible.  Shallow fry on pre-heated pan till golden brown on both sides.  Serve hot with pickle, garlic chutney, raita or any vegetable of your choice.

Thalipeeth


A typical maharashtrian dish made with multi grain flours, usually served as breakfast or snack with butter, yogurt or some dry garlic chutney.  Although quite filling, it is light on the stomach and satisfying.

Thalipeeth can also be made with readymade ‘Bhajani flour’ available in most stores in India, specifically Maharashtra, as it a typical Maharashtrian dish.  In Maharashtrain household Bhajani is made at home by roasting various millets, lentils and grains, grinding to a flour and storing it.  Such flour comes handy when a quick meal is to be prepared.  Bhajani Thalipeeth is popular in West India and Maharashtra in particular which would include Mumbai, the place I grew up!  An important characteristic of making Thalipeeth is a hole is made in the centre so that ghee or oil can be drizzled into it for even frying.  Thalipeeth is a very good to carry for travel as it keeps very well for prolonged periods without refrigeration!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup besan (Gram/chickpea flour)
  • 1 cup jowar flour (Sorghum flour)
  • 1 cup rice flour
  • ½ cup bajra flour (Pearl millet flour)
  • ½ cup wheat flour
  • 1 tbsp. each, chilli, coriander, cumin & garam masala powder
  • 1 tsp. turmeric
  • 2 tbsp. grated Jaggery
  • ½ cup chopped onion
  • ¼ cup chopped coriander leaves
  • 2 tbsp. garlic, finely chopped (optional)
  • Salt to taste
  • Ghee for applying

Mix all above ingredients and knead with enough water into a soft dough.  Cover and let the dough rest for 10 minutes.  Knead lightly again and form the dough into small balls.  Place one ball in between  2 sheets of greased plastic or a wet muslin cloth and roll out the thalipeeth as thin as possible.  Meanwhile, heat the tawa.  Lift one side of the cloth and place the thalipeeth directly onto the hot tawa.  Carefully remove the cloth.  Make a hole in the center of the Thalipeeth.  Can use plastic sheet instead of cloth (make sure the plastic does not touch the tawa to avoid burning).  Cook well on both sides and smear with ghee.  Serve hot with dry garlic chutney or yogurt or raita or fresh coconut and chilli.

Turnips with Greens Bhaji


Knol Khol, Kholrabi, Kholrabi greens, Navalkhol, Gunth Gobi, Ganth Gobi, Shalgam as Turnips are called is a great winter vegetable and a dietary staple in Kashmir.  The mature bulbs can become tough and woody, so look for tender bulbs with tender leaves.  Tender turnips can be grated or shredded and added raw into a salad.  Taste has a touch of raddish and can be included into several cuisines.

Ingredients

  • 2 Turnips with greens
  • ½ tsp. cumin seed
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. chilli powder
  •  1 tsp. coriander seeds powder
  • 1 tsp. Dry Mango powder (Amchur)
  • ½ tsp. salt, or to taste
  • 1 to 2 tbsp. Oil

Clean the turnips, discard the yellow and blemished leave and the stems.  Use only tender green leaves.  Soak the leaves in salted water for 10 to 15 minutes to get rid of insects or dirt if any. Chop the leaves. Peel the turnips and chop into cubes.  Alternately you may cut into thin slices or shred into strips.

Heat a vessel and add oil, when hot add the cumin seed, when they crackle add turmeric and the turnips with the chopped greens.  Add ¼ cup water and cook 10 minutes, stirring once or twice in between.  When the vegetable is cooked, add the chilli, coriander and amchur powder and salt.  Mix and cook further 5 minutes.  Take off flame and serve hot with rotis.

Sambar Udupi Sambar


Vegetable Sambar

Udupi Sambar

Sambar is such a versatile dish, it can be paired with so many south Indian breakfasts, snacks or main meals.  This recipe turns out so delicious, you will never want to try another recipe.

Ingredients

  • 100 gms. Tur dal (Toovar) Split pigeon peas
  • 5 to 6 lady fingers
  • 1 brinjal
  • 1 potato
  • 1 drumstick
  • 8 small peeled onions (keep whole) or 2 medium onion cut into thick slices
  • 2 medium tomatoes
  • 6 red chillies (missed this in the video)
  • 1 tbsp. coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp. fenugreek seeds
  • A pinch asafoetida
  • 6 green chillies
  • 1 lime sized ball tamarind paste
  • 1 tsp. turmeric powder
  • 2 big onions finely sliced
  • Few curry leaves
  • ½ tsp. mustard seeds
  • ½ tsp. cumin seeds
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 to 3 tbsp. coconut oil

Method

Wash dal and soak in water for 1 hour. 

Roast and powder coriander seeds, red chillies, fenugreek seeds and asafoetida.  Cover tamarind with two cups of water for 5 minutes and squeeze out the pulp. 

Cook the dal in the water it was soaked, adding ½ tsp. turmeric and salt till soft.  Remove from fire, add warm water and pulse in a mixer to a paste.

Clean the vegetables and cut into small pieces.  You may use vegetables of your choice.

Heat 2 tbsp. oil and fry the sliced onions till soft.  Add tomatoes, turmeric and salt and cook till tomatoes turn soft.  Add all the vegetables except the lady fingers.  Mix well and add the powdered masala and cook till vegetables are almost done, then add the lady fingers.  When vegetables turn tender, add the dal mixture, mix and put in the chopped green chillies and bring to a boil.  Add tamarind pulp. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes.  Meanwhile heat a pan add the remaining oil and put in curry leaves and mustard and cumin seeds.  When the seeds stop popping transfer immediately to the sambar and serve hot with plain boiled rice, idlis, vadas and dosas. The consistency of the sambar can be adjusted to your choice.

Check out the other Udupi specialities to enjoy with Sambar:-

Idli Sambar:  https://youtu.be/sjFC6Eo-FQ0

Sada Dosa :  https://youtu.be/LxuaPUfsMRU

Uttapam    : https://youtu.be/5NRoejIuUbc

Medu Vada : https://youtu.be/EOA_pY3m4gI

Instant Quinoa Idlis : https://youtu.be/MLVGUfpBRLE

Sweet Potato Khichidi – Ratalayache Kees


Sweet Potato Khichidi – Ratalyache Kees

Promotes gut health, say the health experts!  A dish so full of nutrients yet so simple and easy to make, apart from eating boiled sweet potatoes!

Fasting food!  Upvas recipe. Delicious sweet potatoes, rich in nutrients and fibre and antioxidants that promote the growth of good gut bacteria and contribute to a healthy gut.  Ashadi Ekadashi Special.  This flavourful dish is a combination of spicy, sweet, tart and can be cooked in a jiffy!

Ingredients

  • 2 large or 4 medium Sweet Potatoes
  • 2 green chillies, chopped
  • ½ tsp. cumin seeds
  • 1 sprig curry leaves
  • 2 tbsp. roasted peanut powder
  • 2 tbsp. chopped coriander leaves
  • 2 tbsp. fresh grated coconut
  • 1 tbsp. lemon, or to taste
  • 2 tbsp. ghee
  • 1 tsp. sugar (optional)
  • Salt to taste

Wash and scrub potatoes well.  Not necessary to peel.  Grate and transfer to a bowl of water to prevent oxidation.  Heat a pan and add the ghee.  Reduce flame and add the cumin seeds, when they crackle add curry leaves and green chilli and saute a few seconds.  Add the drained sweet potatoes and mix.  Cover and cook 7-10 minutes on low, stirring occasionally.  Add the peanut powder, salt, sugar and lemon juice and fresh coconut and mix well.  Switch off and let rest 5 minutes, before removing to a serving dish. Garnish with chopped coriander and serve hot.  Enjoy with yogurt and pickle.  An excellent breakfast or snack! Great as an accompaniment to any main meal.  If you have observed, no water is added to the dish and hence the sweet potatoes are likely to stick to the pan. Using a non-stick pan helps.  Nonetheless, the slightly browned part of the Kees that has stuck to the bottom of the pan tastes the best!

Choris Chilly fry Goa Sausage chilli fry Choris Pao


Goan Sausage (Choris) Chilli Fry

The deicious and tantalizing Goa sausages and the famous Choris Pao, a universal favorite, prepared from a simple sausage chilli fry.  The sausages have all the spices required, all that is needed is some onion and potato (if you wish) to prepare this dish.  The taste and flavor of the cooked sausage chilli fry is directly related to the quality of sausages.  So do take care to source the best ones you can find!

Ingredients

  • 20 small beads Goan Sausages (or 10 large ones)
  • 3 to 4 medium onions, as required
  • 1 medium potato (optional)

Remove the string and remove the casing of the sausages.  Some even like to keep the thread and casing and simple cut the sausages strands into 2” pcs.  In this case wash the outer casing of the sausages before using.

Clean and slice the onions roughly into thick slices/pieces.  Peel, wash and chop potato into cubes.  Add the sausages, onions and potato to a vessel.  Barely cover with water and keep on flame and bring to a boil.  Stir at intervals.  Cook till water has almost dried, just a little should remain for gravy.  Serve hot with pao or pulao.

Amla (Indian Goosberry) Saar Rasam


The taste of Indian Amla is sour, bitter and astringent, and it is quite fibrous.  According to Ayurveda, amla fruit is sour (amla) and astringent (kashaya) in taste (rasa), with sweet (madhura), bitter (tikta) and pungent (katu) secondary tastes (anurasas). Its qualities (gunas) are light (laghu) and dry (ruksha), the postdigestive effect (vipaka) is sweet (madhura) and its energy (virya) is cooling (shita). Source Wikipedia

These fruits are reputed to contain high amounts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C). 

Ingredients

  • 6 Gooseberries
  • 1 Tomato
  • 2 tsp. Peppercorns
  • 1 tsp. Cumin seeds
  • 1 pc. Ginger
  • 4 to 5 flakes garlic (optional)
  • 1 green chilli (optional)
  • 1 sprig curry leaves
  • 2 red chillies
  • ½ tsp. mustard seeds
  • 2 tbsp. coconut oil
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste
  • 2 tbsp. coriander leaves

Wash and deseed the amlas.  Wash the tomato, chop and keep aside. Grind the peppercorns and cumin to a powder. Remove and set aside.  To the same jar add the amlas, garlic, ginger, green chilli and grind to a paste adding some water.

Take oil in a vessel and add the ustard seeds, when they splutter add the curry leaves and red chilies, saute for a few seconds, then add the pepper and cumin powder and the chopped tomatoes and add ¼ cup water to cook the tomatoes and to avoid spice powders from burning.  When the tomatoes are soft add the amla paste, sufficient water 1 to 2 cups as per desired consistency, salt, turmeric powder and bring to a boil.  Reduce flame and cook 10 minutes.  Garnish with chopped coriander leaves.  Serve hot as soup or with plain steamed rice.  An excellent winter preparation due to its high vitamin C content.

Surati Papadi Bhaji


Papadi Bhaji – Surati Papdi vegetable (Lima Beans) Vaal Papadi or Sem

This is a winter vegetable in India and found in abundance in the winter season.  The Gujarati famous dish “Oondhiya” is usually made when surati papadi is in season. 

Ingredients

  • 250 gms. Surati Papadi
  • 1 medium onion
  • 2 small tomatoes
  • 2 green chillies (optional)
  • 4 flakes garlic
  • ½ to 1 tsp chilli powder
  • ½ tsp. turmeric powder
  • ¼ tsp. garam masala powder
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste
  • 1 medium potato (optional)
  • 1 tbsp. oil

Wash the papadi, drain.  String the beans by removing the head and the tail and the fibrous string on both sides of the beans.  Split open the papadi pods and remove the seeds and set aside. It is important to split them open because sometimes these beans are infested on the inside, discard the infested ones.  The split pods can be broken or cut into ½” to 1” inch sized pieces.  Sometimes the shells of the beans will be hard and are not edible, in such cases only the seeds are used for cooking.

Chop the onion and tomatoes, slice the garlic and tomatoes.  Heat oil and add the

Onion, garlic and chillies and fry till translucent.  Add the tomatoes and fry for minute.  Add the chilli, turmeric and garam masala powder, mix and add the vegetables and salt.  Add ¼ cup water and cook on high for 5 minutes.  Then add the potatoes if using, mix, cover and cook further 10 minutes till vegetables are cooked.

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