Traditional recipes

Tandoori Chicken


Tandoori Chicken

Tandoori chicken is synonymous with Indian cooking, a universally loved and enjoyed roasted chicken! Tandoori chicken also forms the basis of many Indian gravy dishes like, Butter Chicken, Chicken Tikka masala, Chicken boti kababs. Try this 5 star quality tandoori recipe, which may seem overwhelming but is really quite simple. Roast in an oven or charcoal grill or BBQ on an electric grill. You may also roast on a pan on the stove top, but with this method the chicken tends to leave water while roasting, resulting in loosing some of the flavors of the marinade. But still possible to make tandoori chicken without an oven! Substitute the saffron with turmeric if not available and avoid the orange color if you must! I have not used butter to baste the chicken but does add more flavor and taste.

Ingredients

  • 1 Medium chicken

First Marinade

  • Salt
  • 1 tsp red chillie powder or to taste
  • 2 tbs. lemon juice
  • Butter for basting

Second Marinade

  • 3 tsp. yogurt
  • 3 1/2 tsp. cream
  • 3 tsp. ginger garlic paste
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin powder
  • 1/4 tsp garam masala
  • 1/2 tsp. saffron
  • 2-3 drops orange color
  1. Remove skin, clean and wash chicken.  Make two to three deep incsions each on the breasts, legs and thighs and marinate with salt, chilli powder and lemon juice. Keep aside for 15 minutes.
  2. Whisk yoghurt in a large bowl, add the remaining ingredients and mix well.  Rub the chicken with this mixture.  Keep aside for four hours or overnight if desired.
  3. Preheat oven to 350deg F. Skewer the chicken and keep a tray underneath to collect the drippings or roast in a hot tandoor or pre-heated oven till the moisture evaporates and it starts leaving oil. Baste with butter, if required.
  4. .Cut the tandoori chicken into desired sized pieces and serve with sliced onion, lemon, green salad and naan or any bread of your choice.

Baingan Bhartha


Baingan Bhartha

This Aubergine delicacy is a famous punjabi recipe. Brinjals are available throughout the year and a very common vegetable. A simple vegetable turns into a delectable dish. Even though brinjals are considered as a night shade it is widely consumed. Enjoy this delicious bhartha sa a meal by itself with rotis or phulkas and serve as an accompaniment.

Ingredients

  • 500 gms. Brinjals (Aubergine, Eggplant)
  • ¼ cup ghee
  • 1 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 tsp. ginger. chopped
  • 1 tsp. paprika (or Kashmiri chilli powder) or to taste
  • Salt
  • 2 medium tomatoes, chopped
  • 3 green chillies, chopped
  • 1 cup coriander leaves, chopped

Method

  1. Wash brinjals and wipe dry.
  2. Apply a little oil to the brinjals and roast on direct flame till charred and skin starts peeling off.  This can be done in a charcoal grill to get the charcoal flavor or oven. 
  3. Remove and immerse in water to cool.  Remove he skin and stem and chop.
  4. Heat ghee, add cumin and when it crackles, add onions and cook till translucent, add ginger and saute few seconds. 
  5. Add the chilli powder, salt, mix, add tomatoes and saute till fat appears at the sides. 
  6. Add the chopped brinjals and saute for 5 minutes, add green chillies and mix.  Check seasoning. 
  7. Remove and garnish with coriander leaves. 
  8. Serve with rotis or phulkas.

Mutton Korma Gosht Korma


Mutton Korma Gosht Korma

Gosht Korma is a great lamb curry which does not make use of turmeric.  The consistency of the curry can be made to your choice of taste, thin gravy or thick to almost dry and all are delicious.  Adjust the amount of water accordingly. The thin gravy can be served as a main course with steamed rice. The thick/dry version with any Indian bread.

Ingredients

  • 1 Kg. Lamb, assorted cuts if desired
  • ½ cup ghee
  • 10 green cardamoms
  • 5 cloves
  • 2 sticks cinnamon (1”)
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • 1 cup  chopped onions
  • 4 to 6 tbsp. ginger-garlic paste
  • 2 tsp. coriander powder
  • 1 tsp. red chilli powder
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 cup yogurt
  • 1 tsp. garam masala
  • ½ tsp. black pepper powder
  • 2 drops vetivier (optional)
  • ½ tsp. saffron
  • 2 tbsp. milk
  • Chandi-ka-Varq (optional)
  • 20 Roasted Almonds (optional)
  1. Clean and cut lamb into 1” chunks, clean chops.
  2. Whisk yogurt in a bowl
  3. Dissolve saffron in warm milk
  4. Pound Almonds lightly with a pestle
  5. Heat ghee in a vessel, add cardamoms, cloves, cinnamon and bay leaves, sauté over medium heat until they begin to crackle.
  6. Add onions, sauté until light brown, add the ginger and garlic pastes and sauté until the moisture has evaporated.
  7. Then add the coriander powder, red chillies and salt and stir.
  8. Add lamb, fry for 5 minutes, add yogurt, bring to a boil, add approx. 3 to 4 cups water, cover and simmer stirring occasionally until lamb is almost cooked.
  9. Now add garam masala, and pepper and mix well.
  10. Add vetivier, stir and cover.  Simmer for 10 minutes.  Adjust seasoning.
  11. Add saffron and stir.
  12. Remove to a bowl, garnish with varq and roasted almonds.
  13. Serve with any Indian bread or pulao.

Radish Vegetable


Raddish Vegetable

Radish is in season in winters and an excellent way to add fibre and nutrients to your diet. Radish also helps in fighting cough and cold. Have your tried eating fresh radish marinated in vinegar? If you have a blocked nose, it provides instant relief. East Indians make a lamb curry with radish called Lonvas using east indian bottle masala. Turns out delicious. Mooli parathas a North Indian speciality are famous all over. So enjoy the goodness of radish this winter.

Radish Vegetable (Moolo Bhaji)

Ingredients

  • 1 large bunch radishes with leaves
  • 1 onion sliced
  • 2 red chillies
  • 4 flakes garlic
  • ¼ cup fresh coconut
  • 1 tbsp. coconut oil
  • 1 tsp. salt

Method

  1. Clean the radish by discarding the yellow and stained leaves and reserve the tender and unblemished leaves.
  2. Peel the radish
  3. Place everything in salted water for 10 minutes. 
  4. Drain an rinse well. 
  5. Chop the leaves and slice the radish into thin slices.
  6. Heat the oil in a pan, add the crushed garlic, and red chillies broken into half. Saute a few seconds. 
  7. Add the sliced onion and toss, then add the vegetable, salt, cover and cook 5 to 7 minutes. 
  8. Not necessary to add water as the vegetable releases water. 
  9. However, half way through cooking if the water has dried up, add a quarter cup of water, cover and cook till the radish is tender. 
  10. Add the coconut, mix and cook further 2 minutes. 
  11. Remove and serve hot as accompaniment with Rice curry or serve with rotis. 
  12. Makes a light and healthy dinner with just chapatis (rotis) and moolo bhaji.

Prawn & Kuwalo Curry


Prawn & Kuwalo Curry

A delicious Prawn curry made by adding Ash Pumpkin. Same can be made with Lady Fingers, Spinach, White Pumpkin (Doodhi), Potatoes, etc. Or simply with prawns and raw mango. If mango is used in any preparation, tamarind is omitted, as the raw mango adds the required tartness. Serve this delicious lip-smacking curry with steamed rice, chapattis, or kadak pav (hard bread) that Mumbai is famous for, to mop up the gravy…. Leaving the shells on the prawns adds another dimension to the preparation, it renders the prawns juicy and succulent. Suck the juicy curry trapped in the shell of the prawns before removing the peel and devouring them!!

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Large or medium prawns
  • ½ kg. Kuwalo (Ash Gourd)
  • 2 medium onions, sliced
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 tbsp. oil
  • Grind to a paste
  • 2 to 3 red chillies
  • 1 tbsp. coriander seeds
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 1/4 tsp. peppercorns
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric
  • 2 to 3 tbsp. coconut
  • 1 raw mango
  • 2 flakes garlic
  • 1 small onion

Method

  1. Keeping the shell intact, remove the head, tail and legs of prawns and carefully pull out the vein. 
  2. Wash, apply little salt and set aside. 
  3. Cut the kuwalo into wedges, deseed and peel. Check out my ‘Mutton Polov’ recipe – to prepare the Kuwalo
  4. Cut into 1” cubes and rinse in water, drain.
  5. Heat oil in a vessel, add 1 sliced onion and fry till light brown. 
  6. Add the kuwalo cubes, 1 tsp. salt and cook till half done.
  7. Add the ground masala paste, masala water, adjust the curry.
  8. Bring to a boil, reduce flame and simmer till oil appears around the edges. 
  9. Add the prawns and cook 10 minutes or till oil surfaces.
  10. Check salt and add if necessary.  Serve with steamed rice.

Mutton Polov


Mutton Polov

This is a traditional Mangalorean dish typically served at Roce ceremonies.  The Lunch or dinner at Roce ceremonies is either fish curry or mutton polov alongwith the other main items of the menu like chone tendli sukhe, sannas, vorn etc.

In Mangalore in old times, “Korpo” was used for this preparation i.e. fresh coconut and sliced onion would be put out to dry in the sun and used with the spices for the masala paste.  I am sure this is still being done when cooking is done on a large scale for weddings, etc. For home cooking, we would go with the quicker method of roasting the coconut and onion on a pan!

Mutton Polov

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 kg. mutton
  • ½ kg. Ash Gourd (Kuwalo) (Winter Melon)
  • 2 medium onions
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 cup light coconut milk
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste
  • 2 to 3 tbsp. coconut

Roast and grind to a paste

  • 1 cup heaped fresh coconut
  • 1 onion
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 6 red Kashmiri chillies
  • 1 tbs. coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp.cumin seeds
  • ½ tsp. mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp. raw rice
  • 1” cinnamon
  • 4 cloves
  • 3 cardamoms

Method

  1. Clean and cut mutton into cubes, wash and drain well. 
  2. Clean the ash gourd, cut into wedges, remove the seeds, peel and cut into ½” cubes.  Wash and drain.
  3. Slice one onion and fry in a little oil to light brown
  4. Add the mutton pieces and cook till they change color and most of the water that is released evaporates. 
  5. Add sufficient hot water to the mutton, bring to a boil and cook for about 60 minutes.  If using a cooker, it will be quicker.
  6. Stir in between and add salt half way through cooking. 
  7. When the mutton is tender remove to another dish and set aside. 
  8. In the same vessel add a cup of water, the ash pumpkin cubes, 3 bay leaves, 1 tsp. salt (or to taste) and cook the vegetable adding a cup of thin coconut milk. 
  9. When half done, add the cooked mutton alongwith the stock. 
  10. Bring to a boil and simmer 5 minutes. 
  11. Then add the ground masala paste, adjust the curry by adding the masala water. 
  12. Cook on medium till oil surfaces. 
  13. Test seasoning and add salt if required. 
  14. Meanwhile, take a frying pan add a tbsp. of coconut oil and fry the sliced onion till golden brown. 
  15. Garnish the curry and serve hot with rice or sannas, etc.

Traditional Cucumber Karam


Traditional Cucumber Karam

Traditional Cucumber Karam

  • Servings: 6-10
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Traditional Karam Cucumber Coconut Salad – Thousyache Karam

Ingredients

  • 2 Large cucumbers
  • 2 medium onions
  • Salt to taste
  • Grind to a paste
  • 1 cup fresh coconut
  • 2 green chillies or to taste
  • ½” piece ginger
  • 3 to 4 pieces of tamarind
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • ½ tsp salt, if required.

Method

  1. Cucumbers used for this recipe are the local cucumbers (we call it gaunti toushe).
  2. Wash, peel and remove the seeds of the cucumbers. 
  3. Cut into thick slices. 
  4. Add a tsp of salt, mix and set aside for 10 to 15 minutes. 
  5. The cucumbers will release water.
  6. Squeeze out the water and transfer to a serving bowl. 
  7. Slice the onion horizontally into thick slices and mix with the cucumber. 
  8. Grind the coconut, green chillies, ginger, tamarind and mustard seeds to a coarse paste with a little water. 
  9. Add ½ tsp salt if required. 
  10. Mix the ground paste with the cucumber onion mixture and combine well with your hands. 
  11. Serve cold. 

This is a traditional Mangalorean salad, served on all festive and celebratory occasions.  A must item for the “Novem Jevon” which is celebrated on 8th September, to celebrate the nativity of our Blessed Mother Mary and the blessing of the new harvest i.e. the grains of paddy.

Wishing one & all a Happy Feast!

Here are other dishes that make up the “Novem Jevon” menu:

  1. Sannas
  2. Chana Bhaji
  3. Alun Dento
  4. Karatein Sukhe (Karela vegetable)
  5. Raw Banana Bhaji
  6. Moong Sukha
  7. Kaane Fish curry
  8. Pathrode
  9. Vorn

The dishes can be any variety and any number but must be in odd number. Sannas, Alun Dento, Karatein Sukhe, Chana Bhaji, Vorn are commonly prepared. Understand Udupi and Kundapur side, fish curry alongwith veg dishes are prepared, but proper Managalore side it is only vegetarian preparations.

Chicken Cafreal


Chicken Cafreal

Inspired by Late Wendell Rodricks

Chicken Cafreal

  • Servings: 8 to 10
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1.5 kg. Chicken
  • 1 tsp. garam masala powder
  • 1 tsp. black peppercorns
  • ½ tsp. Turmeric powder
  • 1 bunch coriander leaves (about 100 gms)
  • 12 to 15 flakes garlic
  • 2” piece ginger
  • 6 green chillies (or to taste)
  • 10 cashewnuts
  • 2 Onions
  • 4 Tomatoes (deseeded)
  • 2 tbsp. lemon juice
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 tbsp. Coconut oil
  • 2 tbsp. ghee or as required

Method

  1. Clean and cut the chicken into large pieces. Wash and set aside to drain.
  2. Grind to a paste ingredients from garam masala to lemon juice. 
  3. Marinate the chicken with this masala, add salt and mix well.  Refrigerate overnight.
  4. Heat 2 tbsp ghee and fry the chicken, reserving the marinade, in batches to light brown to seal the juices.  Set the chicken aside.
  5. Heat a vessel and add the coconut oil to the ghee left over from frying the chicken.  If not add a tbsp of ghee. and fry the masala paste for 5 minutes till the raw smell disappears and fat leaves the masala. 
  6. Add the chicken, salt if required, 1 cup hot water and cook till chicken is tender and gravy is thick about 15 minutes.  Simmer till fat separates.
  7. Serve hot garnished with onion rings and lemon wedges.
  8. Repeatedly reheating this dish just makes it better, by improving the texture and taste of the gravy and gives it a deeper color.

Chicken Cafreal

Chicken Cafreal


Chicken Cafreal

Inspired by Late Wendell Rodricks

Chicken Cafreal

  • Servings: 8 to 10
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1.5 kg. Chicken
  • 1 tsp. garam masala powder
  • 1 tsp. black peppercorns
  • ½ tsp. Turmeric powder
  • 1 bunch coriander leaves (about 100 gms)
  • 12 to 15 flakes garlic
  • 2” piece ginger
  • 6 green chillies (or to taste)
  • 10 cashewnuts
  • 2 Onions
  • 4 Tomatoes (deseeded)
  • 2 tbsp. lemon juice
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 tbsp. Coconut oil
  • 2 tbsp. ghee or as required

Method

  1. Clean and cut the chicken into large pieces. Wash and set aside to drain.
  2. Grind to a paste ingredients from garam masala to lemon juice. 
  3. Marinate the chicken with this masala, add salt and mix well.  Refrigerate overnight.
  4. Heat 2 tbsp ghee and fry the chicken, reserving the marinade, in batches to light brown to seal the juices.  Set the chicken aside.
  5. Heat a vessel and add the coconut oil to the ghee left over from frying the chicken.  If not add a tbsp of ghee. and fry the masala paste for 5 minutes till the raw smell disappears and fat leaves the masala. 
  6. Add the chicken, salt if required, 1 cup hot water and cook till chicken is tender and gravy is thick about 15 minutes.  Simmer till fat separates.
  7. Serve hot garnished with onion rings and lemon wedges.
  8. Repeatedly reheating this dish just makes it better, by improving the texture and taste of the gravy and gives it a deeper color.

Chicken Cafreal

MENU PLAN FOR LACTATING MOTHERS


Menu Plan for Lactating Mothers
Menu Plan for Lactating Mothers

Menu V

Typical daily diet for lactating mothers, to be followed for atleast one month after delivery.

A constant dilemma usually faced is what to cook? and what to eat? and for women who have given birth many foods are restricted especially when breastfeeding their baby. Hence, the food choices get further narrowed down. This post is to alleviate some of the confusion as to the diet required to be followed by lactating mothers. Hopefully, these tips would also take away some of the stress in menu planning, faced by those caring for “mother and babe”.

Points to bear in mind:-

  1. Include more of nuts, fruit, vegetables in your diet.
  2. Meals should be light, freshly cooked and easily digestible. 
  3. Avoid packaged and processed foods, aerated drinks, alcohol and packaged juices. Fresh juices are preferable, include yogurt and buttermilk, if possible.
  4. Use only healthy fats like pure ghee, coconut oil, olive oil, sesame oil for cooking.
  5. Avoid heavily spiced food.
  6. Limit sweets and fried food.
  7. Avoid left-over food from previous day etc, as far as possible.
  8. Avoid Pork and Beef.
  9. Avoid Mackerels, Sardines, King Fish, Shrimps & Crabs, Shell-fish i.e. anything from the Crustaceans, shellfish, mollusks group.
  10. Avoid potatoes, brinjals, starchy food and pulses to avoid flatulence and indigestion which can affect the baby through the breast milk.

Daily Diet Plan Schedule is approximate and should be adjusted to suit your day. Most of the recipes are available on this site and can be accessed by clicking on the link. Additional options/recipes can be found in the book “Mais Recipes”.

Fenugreek/Ajwain (Carom seeds) tea 3 to 4 times a day or throughout the day instead of plain water.

To prepare Fenugreek Ajwain water : Add a teaspoon each of Fenugreek, Ajwain (Carom seeds), Cumin and Fennel (Badishep) seeds to one litre or 1.5 litres of water, bring to a boil, switch off flame, cover and let it infuse for 10 minutes. Strain and reserve, to be taken by the mother, preferably warm, throughout the day instead of normal water

On rising

Warm water or Ajwain/Fenugreek tea, 5 to 10 soaked almonds with 1 or 2 dates. (Pre-soak the almonds the previous night, next morning peel and eat).

Breakfast – 08:00 a.m. approx.

1.Preferably hot/warm breakfast consisting of either of the following options :

2. Milk, or tea coffee made with milk

3. A tablespoon of  the lactating traditional preparation Thiklem.

Mid-morning: 11:00 a.m. approx.

  1. Porridge made of oats, ragi (tisan), vermicilli, rawa, or bread butter with tea coffee made with milk.
  2. One tablespoon of either Ginger (Aale) or Garlic (Lohsun), if available.

Lunch : 01:00 p.m. approx.

With steaming hot Rice.

  1. Main dish Either Fish/Lamb (Mutton)/Chicken/Vegetarian.

2. Side dish Options:

  • Grilled or Fried fish/Chicken/Mutton Chops
  • Vegetables like, leafy greens, spinach, pumpkin, gourds, french beans, tendli (Ivy Gourd/Gherkins) yam (very good for internal healing), lady fingers, raw banana.

3. Salad Options- cucumber, beetroot, carrot, lettuce, sprouts, quinoa, fresh thyme salad, etc.

4. A bowl of Nivol on alternate days (not everyday)- drink the nivol with your meal or you can have over your rice with some grilled fish/chicken.

OR

Methi Paez or Ajwain Paez as dessert after food. So if you are having Nivol, skip the methi/ajwain paez, have either one of the three.

Once in a while include Gulianchi Kheer, for dessert instead of Methi or Ajwain Paez.

Evening Tea: 04:00 to 05:00 p.m.

A tablespoon of Thiklem and some small snack or dry bhel, khakra, etc., or fruit.

It is advisable to limit intake of tea and coffee to once a day or maximum two per day, if you must.

Late evening: 07:00 p.m. approx.

Vegetable, Chicken or  Beef or Mutton Bones Soup.  It is advisable to have a bowl of warm soup daily, prepare the instant soup, if you must.

Dinner: 08:000 p.m. (or soon after your soup)

Similar to lunch options. With Rice preferably, or with any type of bread.

Bedtime: 10:00 p.m. (Optional)

Hot milk or Turmeric Milk (Haldi Doodh). Helps in healing and promotes good sleep, immunity booster.

To prepare Turmeric Milk – Boil one cup milk with 3/4 tsp. turmeric powder, 1 tsp. Misri (Candy sugar) or honey, 1/4 tsp. pepper powder. Sip slowly while hot. If using honey do not add while boiling, add after boiling, stir and drink hot.

Fruit – Anytime in between meals – Preferably seasonal fruit, Apples, Pears, Oranges, Bananas, Avocados, Cantaloup, Chickoo, Figs, Cherries, Grapes.

N.B. : Above is a guide for menu planning alongwith traditional mangalorean foods to consume while breastfeeding. Please bear in mind I am niether a dietician nor a nutritionist. The guide is what I have learnt from my mother and from elders in our family and from my personal experiences of giving birth to three children and having three grandchildren. As I have benefitted from these experiences, I am sharing the information. Please seek professional or medical advice when necessary.

For further information on Postnatal Care for Lactating Mothers, please click on the link

Would be happy to notify you whenever a new post is published. Please enter your email ID and follow me. Thank you!

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Cooking with Spinach


Leafy green vegetables are high in nutrients, low in calories, important for skin, hair, bone and overall health, while providing the necessary protein, iron, vitamins and minerals.  It is advisable to incorporate a leafy vegetable daily into our diets for optimum health.  It is also affordable and easy to prepare.

Here are a few easy recipes using spinach:-

  1. Mutton Palak – A delicious non-vegetarian dish using spinach with the least amount of spice, yet full of flavour.
Mutton Palak

2. Hara Bara Kabab – Spinach, Green Peas and Potatoes combined to make the famous Tikkis. Serve as a starter, appetizer or a healthy snack!

Hara Bara Kabab

3. Kashmiri Saag – Spinach cooked with a exorbitant amount of garlic and red chillies, but does not overwhelm the dish, just makes it superbly but mildly spiced with the flavors of garlic.

Kashmiri Saag

4. Dahi Palak – A dish you can throw together in minutes yet turns out delicious. Serve with steamed rice, Khichidi, Pulao or with rotis or any Indian bread.

Dahi Palak

5. Tuna & Braised Onion Salad – A salad which doubles up also as a main course! Just enjoy it with some crusty bread or Pita bread or any Indian bread and your meal is done for the day!!

Tuna & Braised Onion Salad

More ways to cook with leafy vegetables –

Spinach and leafy vegetables can also be cooked using the simple mangalorean ‘Thel Piao” method using green chillies, onion, garlic, a little oil and water and cooking till done and then garnishing with fresh coconut.

Curries like spinach or Valchi Bhaji with prawns, or black-eyed beans are some of popular recipes using leafy vegetables. My recipe for Alun stem with Alasande can be used for these dishes.

The book “Mais Recipes” has the recipes for these dishes.

Would be happy to notify you whenever a new post is published. Please enter your email ID and follow me. Thank you!

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Set Dosa


‘Pole’ for Mangaloreans and ‘Kallappam’ for Keralites, these soft spongy pancakes can be relished with chutney for breakfast or even with jam, butter or eaten just plain dipped in your tea or coffee!! These dosas are quite popular in the South of India.

For lunch or dinner serve with a chicken curry, mutton curry or vegetable stew so the dosa mops up the delicious gravy giving you a succulent morsel of food thoroughly satisfying to your tastebuds and your tummy!

Set dosa can be made with sanna or dosa batter which uses rice and urad dal (black gram dal) as its ingredients. 

The following recipe does not use urad dal but uses coconut and rice making the dosas lighter & spongy.  The recipe is similar to Appam, but the consistency of the batter should be kept slightly thicker for making Set Dosas. The size is smaller than the Udupi masala or sada dosas. You can use a dosa pan for making them but a smaller cast iron pan or frying pan would give a uniform and perfect circular shape to these dosas.

Idli rice can be used, if available, but I used basmati rice with good results. If fresh coconut is not available, use ½ cup coconut milk or ½ cup coconut milk powder. If the batter is fermenting overnight, do check on it in case you wake up in the night (to drink water or use the washroom) and if it has risen but it is too early to make the dosas, promptly put the risen batter in the fridge and make the dosas once you are ready. You don’t have to worry about having to prepare them at 4 or 5 am just because the batter is fermented. The Batter will stay fresh in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days.

Soak the rice for 4 to 6 hours and grind to a thick paste alongwith the cooked rice and coconut. Mix the yeast with the sugar and warm water and leave to bloom for 10 minutes. Add to the rice paste, mix well and leave to ferment for 6 to 8 hours.  Fermenting time will depend on room temperature.  If weather is cold, use warm (not hot)  water for grinding the batter. In warm weather it will ferment in 4 hours.

When the batter has risen, add salt and mix.  Heat a cast iron pan or a frying pan on medium high heat until very hot. 

Pour one ladle or 1/2 cup of batter on the hot pan. (Do not spread the batter like you would do for the Masala dosa).  Leave as is, cover with lid and cook till underside turns golden and dosa gets spongy and translucent and is covered with holes. 

If you wish you may turn and cook the other side. 

Serve with red coconut chutney.

Set Dosa

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 2 cups rice, preferably idli rice
  • 1 cup cooked rice
  • 1 cup fresh coconut
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp dry yeast
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 tbsp. warm water

Method

  1. Soak the rice for 4 to 6 hours and grind to a thick paste alongwith the cooked rice and coconut. 
  2. Mix the yeast with the sugar and warm water and leave to bloom for 10 minutes.
  3. Add to the rice paste, mix well and leave to ferment for 6 to 8 hours.  Fermenting time will depend on room temperature.  If weather is cold, use warm (not hot)  water for grinding the batter. In warm weather it will ferment in 4 hours.
  4. When the batter has risen, add salt and mix.  Heat a cast iron pan or a frying pan on medium high heat until very hot. 
  5. Pour one ladle or 1/2 cup of batter on the hot pan. (Do not spread the batter like you would do for the Masala dosa).  Leave as is, cover with lid and cook till underside turns golden and dosa gets spongy and translucent and is covered with holes. 
  6. If you wish you may turn and cook the other side. 
  7. Serve with red coconut chutney

Red coconut chutney

Same as green coconut chutney but substitute the green chilles and coriander leaves with two to three red cillies.

Rest of the recipe is the same.

Thiklem and Randho food for lactating mothers


(Pictures and step-by-step guide for Thiklem (Sukho Randho) are posted below).

My recent post on Pospartum care Thiklem & Rando gave details of the traditional recipes for Thiklem (Dry Randho also called Sukho Randho) and Randho (Wet, jam like consistency) and the simple version with readily available ingredients.

I will re-state here only the simple version of the recipes, with some modification, to make it easier to understand and prepare.

Randho (Wet)

Ingredients

  1. 1 Litre coconut milk
  2. 750 gms. Palm Jaggery
  3. 250 gms. Poha (flat)
  4. 250 gms. Tup/Pure ghee
  5. 100 gms. Onions, sliced
  6. 100 gms. Garlic, sliced
  7. 50 gms. Dill Seeds (Shopa)/or Fennel seeds
  8. 50 gms. Kuskus (Poppy seeds) or Sesame seeds
  9. 50 gms. Cumin seeds
  10. 50 gms. Ajwain/Carom seeds
  11. 50 gms Fenugreek seeds
  12. 50 gms. Corainder seeds
  13. 50 gms. Mustard seeds
  14. 50 gms. Black Pepper corns
  15. 50 gms. Turmeric
  16. 10 gms. Cardamom
  17. 1 no. Nutmeg
  18. 1 gm. Saffron (Kesar)
  19. 100 gms. Dry Dates
  20. 50 gms. Raisins
  21. 100 gms. Almonds
  22. 100 gms. Cashewnuts

Method

  • Roast all the spices from Dill seeds to Black pepper and grind to a paste with some water.
  • Take a pan, place on heat and add the coconut milk alongwith the ground paste.
  • Mix well and cook stirring consantly.
  • Add turmeric, sliced onions, garlic, grated nutmeg, powdered cardamom and grated jaggery.
  • Cook till mixture turns dark brown.
  • Add ghee and mix till well incorporated.
  • Add the chopped dry fruits, kesar, poha and cook till glossy.
  • Remove, allow to cool and store in glass or steel container or bottle and refrigerate.
  • 1 tbsp. to be given warm, once day at breakfast to the mother of new born baby after ten days.

Thiklem (Dry) Also called Sukho Randho

Thiklem (Sukho Randho)

I have now tried the recipe and happy to post the step-by-step pictures and modifications in the recipe so as to simplify the process. To make it easier I have used a third of the quantities from the previous recipe. Feel it is better to make in small quantities so the process does not become too tedious. Secondly, if it is enjoyed and benefiting the new mother then additional batches can be easily made.

Ingredients (Same as above except coconut milk but add fresh or dessicated coconut as stated below)

  1. 1 cup (packed) Coconut (Fresh or dessicated)
  2. 1 1/2 cup Palm Jaggery (if not use any available jaggery)
  3. 1/2 cup Tup/Pure ghee
  4. 1 large Onion, sliced
  5. 1/4 cup Garlic, sliced
  6. 1/2 tsp. Fennel Seeds
  7. 1 tsp. Kuskus (Poppy seeds) (Substitute with sesame seeds, if not available)
  8. 1/2 tsp. Cumin seeds
  9. 1/2 tsp. Ajwain/Carom seeds
  10. 1/2 tsp. Fenugreek seeds
  11. 1/2 tsp. Corainder seeds
  12. 1/2 tsp. Mustard seeds
  13. 1/2 tsp Black Pepper corns
  14. 1/2 tsp. Turmeric
  15. 1/4 tsp. Cardamom seeds
  16. 1/4 tsp. Nutmeg
  17. A pinch Saffron (Kesar)
  18. 1/4 cup Dry Dates
  19. 1/4 cup Raisins
  20. 1/4 cup Almonds
  21. 1/4 cup Cashewnuts

Method

  • Dry roast all the spices from Fennel seeds to Black Pepper. Grind to a powder alongwith the turmeric, cardamom, nutmeg and saffron.
  • Slice the onion, garlic, dates, raisins, almonds and cashews.
  • Take half the tup/pure ghee in a wide pan or kadai and gently fry the sliced onions till golden brown, remove.
  • Fry the garlic till light brown, remove.
  • Fry the raisin, almonds, cashewnuts, dates, one by one and remove.
  • Add the remaining ghee and add the spice powder, saute a few seconds.
  • Add the coconut and fry till golden brown.
  • Add the jaggery and saute till it begins to melt.
  • Add the fried onion, garlic, almonds, raisins, cashews, date mixture and fry gently till dry and ghee just starts to separate.
  • Remove to a dish and leave to cool.
  • Crush lightly to break-up the lumps and store in a glass or steel container when completely cool.
  • 1 tbsp. to be taken warm, once or twice a day at breakfast & evening tea by the mother of new born baby after ten days.

As stated in my Postpartum care Thiklem and Randho post, I have yet to try the Wet Randho recipe. Shall post the pictures and fine tune the recipe as done for the Sukho Randho recipe, if necessary. Meanwhile, if anyone makes it would love to know/see the outcome.

Due to the lockdown many new mothers are having to fend for themselves post delivery with no mothers/mother-in-law/grandmothers, etc. to be with them and assist as restrictions on travel continue to be in place. As a result, I have received several requests for these recipes. Other recipes for lactating mothers and baby care are already menioned in my previous posts on Foods for lactating mothers.

Postpartum Care Thiklem and Randho


The Thiklem and Randho (Simple version) recipes are here.

Below I have given the most traditional of the recipes here, mainly for reference, as I was unable to source majority of the 41 ingredients required, so could not prepare it myself, but anyone enterprising enough and is able to procure all the ingredients could very well try the recipe. I have also given below a more recent and easier recipe which I am sure will be more appealing and can be easily prepared.

I absolutely do not post any recipes unless I have tried atleast a couple of times to satisfactory results. But as I have been receiving constant requests for Randho & Thiklem, I have decided to post the recipes as is.

In my post Postpartum Care – Foods for lactating mothers, I stated my intention to post the Thiklem and Rando recipes as and when I find them. This traditional olden days recipe is for Randho – both the wet and dry version – the wet jam like paste is called Randho and the dry version is called Thiklem. This recipe from the book “Randpi” by Isidore Coelho, was kindly given to me by Mrs. Jenifer Dias, who also helped me with the english translation, to whom I am grateful for sharing with me so that it can benefit all new mothers.

I am posting a picture of the Konkani recipe which contains all the traditional medicinal herbs and spices, all of 41 ingredients, that go into its preparation. Those who can read konkani would understand the recipe better. I have given a translation, with assistance, as I can neither read nor write konkani. I have done my utmost to provide it accurately. The ingredient pictures should assist further in your understanding. This recipe seems to have been published in the 1940s, most likely so I am not aware of the quantity one could get for 50 paise!

Thiklem/Randho Page 1 of 3
Thiklem/Randho Page 2 of 3
Thiklem/Randho Page 3 of 3

Randho (wet) (Translated from above Konkani recipe)

Ingredients

  1. 50 paise          Badishep/Fennel
  2. 50   ”                Lutipal ?
  3. 50   ”                Lutiphol ?
  4. 75   ”                Pepper (Nanji Mirian)
  5. 75   ”                Vayu Vilanga/All Spice
  6. 75   ”                Peempli (Long Pepper)
  7. 50   ”                Cloves
  8. 75  ”                 Chor Owon/Ajwain (Same as 22?)
  9. 75 ”                 Poulancho Kando ?
  10. 75  ”                 Ratan Purush
  11. 75 ”                 Hasigundi ?
  12. 25 ”                 Taraviti Jeera
  13. 75  ”                 Neggina Mullu
  14. 1.00 Rupee     Nilpee
  15. 75 nos             Cardamom
  16. 1.00 Rupee     Kesar
  17. 75 nos.            Pepper (Hadi miri)
  18. 1 spoon          Mustard seeds
  19. 15 gms           Kala Misri
  20. 15 gms.          Safed Misri
  21. 125 gms.        Jeera
  22. 125 gms.        Ovon/Ajwain
  23. 250 gms.        Small Badishep
  24. 75 gms.          Dry Ginger
  25. 500 gms.        Doodhval ?
  26. 50 gms.         Coriander seeds
  27. 100 gms.        Garlic
  28. 300 gms.        Arbi Gond
  29. 250 gms.        Kuskus
  30. 500 gms.        Small Badam
  31. 500 gms.        Khadi Sakkar
  32. 500 gms.        Kismis
  33. 750 gms.        Ghati Jaggery
  34. 500 gms.        Ushe God ?
  35. 4 pcs.              Nutmeg/Jaiphal
  36. 3 pcs.              Myfol
  37. ¼ Litre           Coconut oil
  38. 1 Litre            Tup
  39. 1/2 litre Milk
  40. 5 pcs.              Flat round jaggery
  41. 5 nos.             Coconuts

(If I have made an error in the translation or a misrepresentation in the illustrations, I would love to know so I can correct myself).

Method

Pick, clean and wash all medicinal herbs and dry well in sun, grind to a powder. Clean and dry all spices in the sun, grind to a powder. Grind the kuskus and remove juice and grind the herbs and spices powder with this juice. Remove juice of the coconuts. Heat the oil and fry the gond till it puffs. Remove and keep aside. Add the kuskus-herb-spice paste, coconut milk, jaggery, milk, misri, khadi shakar, mix and cook on slow flame for one hour. Then add the tup, oil and gond, mix and simmer. Add nuts and kismis and cook for 8 hours making sure it does not stick to the bottom of he pan.

Thiklem (Dry) Also called Sukho Randho

Ingredients (Same as above)

All above ingredients (with some variation).

Take the medicinal herbs and spices, clean, wash and dry in the sun and grind to powder. Scrape 6 coconuts and slice 750 gms. onions. Mix both and dry in the sun for half a day. Extract juice of 1 and half coconuts, take 750 gms basmati rice and the medicine/spice powder and grind to paste with the coconut milk. Form into small balls and fry in some oil/tup. Remove and pound the fried rice balls. Put gond in oil till fluffy. Add garlic, almonds (assume the garlic and almonds would be cut into slivers), kismis and kuskus and fry gently. Pour the remaining oil in the kadai and fry the onion coconut mixture. Pound the jaggery and khadi shakar and add to the other ingredients, mix well, heat on flame and cook till dry.

I have had the sukho Thiklem/Randho, made by my ‘Balanti Posteli’ in 1983 in Kuwait when my first child Raoul was born. But it was definitely a very simple version of the above recipe. I distinctly remember munching and enjoying a tablespoon each morning of a crunchy and loosely dry mixture of deep fried onion, coconut, almonds, raisins and garlic which were the predominant ingredients. That was the only time I had it.

I have tried to get the pictures of the herbs and spices, as much as possible, for easy reference (Some may be indicative).

 However, don’t be overwhelmed wih the above recipe, here is a simple one (I recently came across) to save your day!

Randho (Wet) (Indicative picture below)

Randho – Jam like consistency similar to picture

Ingredients

  1. 1 Litre coconut milk
  2. 750 gms. Palm Jaggery
  3. 250 gms. Poha (flat)
  4. 250 gms. Tup/Pure ghee
  5. 100 gms. Onions, sliced
  6. 100 gms. Garlic, sliced
  7. 50 gms. Dill Seeds (Shopa)
  8. 50 gms. Kuskus (Poppy seeds)
  9. 50 gms. Cumin seeds
  10. 50 gms. Ajwain/Carom seeds
  11. 50 gms Fenugreek seeds
  12. 50 gms. Corainder seeds
  13. 50 gms. Mustard seeds
  14. 50 gms. Black Pepper corns
  15. 50 gms. Turmeric
  16. 10 gms. Cardamom
  17. 1 no. Nutmeg
  18. 1 gm. Saffron (Kesar)
  19. 100 gms. Dry Dates
  20. 50 gms. Raisins
  21. 100 gms. Almonds
  22. 100 gms. Cashewnuts

Method

  • Roast all the spices from Dill seeds to Black pepper and grind to a paste with some water.
  • Take a pan, place on heat and add the coconut milk alongwith the ground paste.
  • Mix well and cook stirring consantly.
  • Add turmeric, sliced onions, garlic, grated nutmeg, powdered cardamom and grated jaggery.
  • Cook till mixture turns dark brown.
  • Add ghee and mix till well incorporated.
  • Add the chopped dry fruits, kesar, poha and cook till glossy.
  • Remove, allow to cool and store in glass or steel container or bottle and refrigerate.
  • 1 tbsp. to be given once a day at breakfast to the mother of new born baby after ten days.

Thiklem (Dry)

Using above simple Randho ingredients, can be prepared as per recipe given under the traditonal Thiklem i.e. Sukho Randho stated above.        

Have detailed the simple Thiklem and Randho receipes on this post.          

Turmeric Patoleo Leaves


Turmeric

Turmeric Rhizomes and leaves

Turmeric plants are grown from the turmeric root (rhizomes) and are harvested for their leaves and the turmeric rhizomes.  Rhizomes are used for plantation.  Turmeric rhizomeIt grows best indoors in cold temperatures. In temperate climates it can be planted in the garden but preferably in shaded areas like under a large tree which would provide the required shade to the turmeric plants as they don’t flourish well in direct sunlight.

Turmeric is different from Ginger.  Although they look alike and have common characteristics, they are different in their properties, effects, colors, flavors and benefits.

ginger

Fresh Ginger & Ginger Powder

Fresh Turmeric, Dried Turmeric and Turmeric powder or haldi powder

 

Turmeric rhizomes can be purchased from any Asian grocery stores and the plants take 7 to 10 months from planting to harvest and are usually planted in July and harvested in April.  The best season to plant turmeric in sub-tropic and cold zones is in spring or summer when temperatures are above 54 degF or 12 degC. In tropical regions it can be grown throughout the year.

turmeric leaves

Charlotte Regional Farmers Market – Peanutbutterrunner.com

trmeric leaves sale12janTVLpongaGU937RHGU3jpgjpgSale of turmeric plants in the market for Pongal – The Hindu

In countries where turmeric leaves are not available in the market it is a good idea to plant your own and enjoy the benefits of this wonderful plant.  The World Wide Web is awash with tips and step by step procedure on growing your own turmeric plant so I shall leave it at that.  Secondly, as I have personally not yet grown my own plants I shall refrain from preaching on this subject. But, yes I have purchased turmeric leaves from Goa Mapusa market and kept the leaves neatly wrapped in newspaper in the freezer and used them for a couple of years.  Trust me, when thawed the leaves were as fresh and as fragrant as if fresh from the market.  So for those resident outside India, I would urge you to pick up your stock on your visit to India (when they are in season) and bring it back and freeze until required. I thank my friend Mrs. Margaret D’Cruz for this valuable tip.

Turmeric leaves are a cooling herb and a sattvic food which promotes clear thinking and calm thoughts. The leaves also known as haldi and manjal leaves, contain curcumin which is a powerful antioxidant.

It can be used in various preparations to add flavor but commonly used as a wrapper for steamed dishes.  The famous and much revered haldikolyanche Patoleo  as it is called in konkani

Patoleos (22)

Patholis

(also called patholis or pathoyos) and kadubu in Kannada, especially in the western coast of India during religious months and festivals, are made by steaming a paste of rice with a coconut jaggery filling wrapped in the turmeric leaf.  When heated the leaf imparts a delicious aroma to the dish and it’s fragrance is immensely satisfying.

August 15 (Independence Day in India) happens to coincide with the Assumption of the Virgin Mary (a Holy day of obligation) and Patoleos are a significant item prepared by Mangalorean and Goan catholics on this day.  East Indians call it Pan Mori or East Indian leaf cakes. It is also prepared on St, John’s feast (Sao Joao fest) and Konsachem fest (harvest festival).  Ediyos, steamed in jackfruit leaves were also prepared on August 15, by my mother.

Konkani hindus prepare patoleos on the second Sunday of Sharavan or Nag Panchami and on Hartalika, the eve of Ganesh Chaturthi.  Salt-free patoleos, are offered to Godess Parvati, who the legends say had a strong craving for these sweets during pregnancy.

It is important to procure genuine turmeric/haldi leaves for the patholis.  Duplicate or fake leaves are available in plenty in the market and it is difficult to tell the difference. Patholis made with duplicate leaves have an overpowering aroma and give a bitter taste to the patholis.  Although difficult to distinguish from appearance, genuine leaves must have a fragrant aroma and to determine this just pinch a piece from the tip of the leaf, it should smell aromatic and fragrant.

Several types of leaves are available for steaming, grilling food. Some of these are Banana leaves, Jackfruit leaves, Teak leaves, Bay leaves, Fig leaves, Maple leaves, Corn husks, Okra (Lady finger) leaves, etc.  Champa flower leaves are also used for steaming food.

Be creative and make do with what is available and enjoy rather than omitting  your traditional foods altogether!

Ref: Wikipedia, Turmeric for health.com,

Picture credits: smallgreenthings.com.au, peanutbutterrunner.com, livestrong.com

Jackfruit leaves
%d bloggers like this: