Mangalorean recipes

Sambar Udupi Sambar


Vegetable Sambar

Udupi Sambar

Sambar is such a versatile dish, it can be paired with so many south Indian breakfasts, snacks or main meals.  This recipe turns out so delicious, you will never want to try another recipe.

Ingredients

  • 100 gms. Tur dal (Toovar) Split pigeon peas
  • 5 to 6 lady fingers
  • 1 brinjal
  • 1 potato
  • 1 drumstick
  • 8 small peeled onions (keep whole) or 2 medium onion cut into thick slices
  • 2 medium tomatoes
  • 6 red chillies (missed this in the video)
  • 1 tbsp. coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp. fenugreek seeds
  • A pinch asafoetida
  • 6 green chillies
  • 1 lime sized ball tamarind paste
  • 1 tsp. turmeric powder
  • 2 big onions finely sliced
  • Few curry leaves
  • ½ tsp. mustard seeds
  • ½ tsp. cumin seeds
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 to 3 tbsp. coconut oil

Method

Wash dal and soak in water for 1 hour. 

Roast and powder coriander seeds, red chillies, fenugreek seeds and asafoetida.  Cover tamarind with two cups of water for 5 minutes and squeeze out the pulp. 

Cook the dal in the water it was soaked, adding ½ tsp. turmeric and salt till soft.  Remove from fire, add warm water and pulse in a mixer to a paste.

Clean the vegetables and cut into small pieces.  You may use vegetables of your choice.

Heat 2 tbsp. oil and fry the sliced onions till soft.  Add tomatoes, turmeric and salt and cook till tomatoes turn soft.  Add all the vegetables except the lady fingers.  Mix well and add the powdered masala and cook till vegetables are almost done, then add the lady fingers.  When vegetables turn tender, add the dal mixture, mix and put in the chopped green chillies and bring to a boil.  Add tamarind pulp. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes.  Meanwhile heat a pan add the remaining oil and put in curry leaves and mustard and cumin seeds.  When the seeds stop popping transfer immediately to the sambar and serve hot with plain boiled rice, idlis, vadas and dosas. The consistency of the sambar can be adjusted to your choice.

Check out the other Udupi specialities to enjoy with Sambar:-

Idli Sambar:  https://youtu.be/sjFC6Eo-FQ0

Sada Dosa :  https://youtu.be/LxuaPUfsMRU

Uttapam    : https://youtu.be/5NRoejIuUbc

Medu Vada : https://youtu.be/EOA_pY3m4gI

Instant Quinoa Idlis : https://youtu.be/MLVGUfpBRLE

Amla (Indian Goosberry) Saar Rasam


The taste of Indian Amla is sour, bitter and astringent, and it is quite fibrous.  According to Ayurveda, amla fruit is sour (amla) and astringent (kashaya) in taste (rasa), with sweet (madhura), bitter (tikta) and pungent (katu) secondary tastes (anurasas). Its qualities (gunas) are light (laghu) and dry (ruksha), the postdigestive effect (vipaka) is sweet (madhura) and its energy (virya) is cooling (shita). Source Wikipedia

These fruits are reputed to contain high amounts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C). 

Ingredients

  • 6 Gooseberries
  • 1 Tomato
  • 2 tsp. Peppercorns
  • 1 tsp. Cumin seeds
  • 1 pc. Ginger
  • 4 to 5 flakes garlic (optional)
  • 1 green chilli (optional)
  • 1 sprig curry leaves
  • 2 red chillies
  • ½ tsp. mustard seeds
  • 2 tbsp. coconut oil
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste
  • 2 tbsp. coriander leaves

Wash and deseed the amlas.  Wash the tomato, chop and keep aside. Grind the peppercorns and cumin to a powder. Remove and set aside.  To the same jar add the amlas, garlic, ginger, green chilli and grind to a paste adding some water.

Take oil in a vessel and add the ustard seeds, when they splutter add the curry leaves and red chilies, saute for a few seconds, then add the pepper and cumin powder and the chopped tomatoes and add ¼ cup water to cook the tomatoes and to avoid spice powders from burning.  When the tomatoes are soft add the amla paste, sufficient water 1 to 2 cups as per desired consistency, salt, turmeric powder and bring to a boil.  Reduce flame and cook 10 minutes.  Garnish with chopped coriander leaves.  Serve hot as soup or with plain steamed rice.  An excellent winter preparation due to its high vitamin C content.

Gulliyo Deep Fried Marbles


Christmas Sweets – Kuswar

Gulliyo – Deep fried Marbles

I always wanted to try out ‘Gulliyo’ but not sure why I waited so long.  They turned out delicious, crisp and crunchy. You will enjoy eating this sweet. However, Guliyo does not store very well in airtight containers because they tend to soften making them a bit chewy.  So the best way is to make and serve immediately or store in a box and deep fry briefly before serving.  A delightful Mangalorean Kuswar item!

Ingredients

1 cup Basmati rice

1 cup Boiled rice (I used Goa rice)

1 cup coconut milk

1 cup jaggery, or to taste

6 to 8 cardamoms

½ tsp. Salt

Oil for frying

Wash and soak the rice for atleast 5 hours.  Drain and grind to a thick smooth paste with the jaggery, cardamoms, salt adding as much coconut milk as required.  Batter may become watery due to adding extra coconut milk to run the mixer, but no worries.  After the batter is nice and fine and smooth, transfer to a ceramic or glass bowl and microwave at ½ minute intervals and stir to mix well. Then put it back in the microwave till you get a firm dough and you can form a ball on the palm of your hand.  Knead well.  Form into marble sized balls.  Heat oil for deep frying and fry in batches on medium low heat till brown and crisp. Don’t make hem too dark as they will turn out hard.  They should be crunchy and crisp.

Stuffed Pomfret with green masala in Banana leaf


Delicious, succulent and moist Stuffed Pomfrest in mouth watering green masala and cooked iun banana leaf which prevents the fish from absorbing too much oil! Use stuffing of your choice, red, green or recheado masala. Recipe is from my mother’s book “Mais Recipes”. Get hold of your copy soon. Here is the link for details: https://cooklikececilia.com/mais-recipes-contact-details

Raw Banana Erussery


Banana Erussery   (Chena Vazhakkai Erissery)

Raw bananas have several health benefits so we always find new ways to add them to our diet.  This is a Kerala style preparation and one of the items on an Onam Sadya.  Referred to as Chena Vazhakkai Erissery or Ellisery, this is a simple dish with the use of fresh coconut, curry leaves and cumin seeds as the only ingredients for the gravy apart from onion, red chillies and garlic with some coconut for garnish. Yam, pumpkin and beans are also included as per personal preference.  I have added some pre-cooked jackfruit seeds. Enjoy with steamed rice or appams!

Ingredients

  • 3 large raw bananas
  • ½ cup boiled jackfruit seeds
  • ½ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup fresh grated coconut
  • ½ tsp. black pepper (optional)
  • 1 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 2 sprigs curry leaves
  • ½ tsp. mustard seeds
  • 4 flakes garlic, cushed
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 4 to 6 small round red chillies (or 2 long chillies, broken into pieces)
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • Peel the bananas and chop into small cubes.  Immerse in water till required.

Boil the banana pieces with turmeric and salt and 1 cup water.  Grind ½ the coconut, cumin and curry leaves to a paste adding water.  Add to the cooked bananas, mix and cook 5 minutes.  Heat oil in a pan, add mustard seed and when they pop add the crushed garlic and onion.  When light brown, add the remaining coconut and fry till nice and brown.  Add to the erussery (reserve some for garnish) and mix well. Remove to a serving dish and serve hot garnished with some fried onion coconut mixture.

Sheviyo Idiyappam String Hoppers


Sheviyo or Shevigo also known as Idiyappam or string hopper is made with ground rice steamed and then pressed into a hand held sev mould or a typical stand alone shevigo equipment.  In Kerala, Tamil Nadu etc Idiyappam is made of rice flour mixed with hot water 2:1 proportion with salt and little oil and kneaded to a soft dough.  The dough balls are then put in the sev mould and pressed onto idli trays and steamed.

I have illustrated the Mangalorean and Goan style of making the Sheviyo i.e. soaking rice, grind to a paste then steaming the batter as a rice cake which is then cut into pieces and pressed as string hoppers with a sev mould.

It can be eaten as a sweet dish for breakfast or a teatime snack garnish with chunn i.e. a jaggery coconut filling or with sweet ros i.e. coconut milk and jaggery mixture.

As a savoury dish serve them with any coconut milk (Roce) curry like chicken or mutton or vegetable stew.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups boiled rice or 1 cup basmati and one cup boiled mixed
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste

Coconut Jaggery (Chunn) filling

  • 1 cup fresh grated coconut
  • ½ cup jaggery grated
  • ¼ tsp. cardamom powder

Coconut Jaggery Milk

  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • ½ cup jaggery or to taste
  • ¼ tsp. cardamom powder

Wash and soak the rice for atleast 6 hours.  Gridn to a smooth paste, add salt, mix and transfer to a cake tin to steam.  Set the steamer and when the water boils place the dish with the rice batter on the steamer and steam for 20 to 25 minutes on medium high.  To check if done, pierce a knife and should come out clean.  Cut the rice cake into large pieces and press the pieces through a sevio or sev (ghatia/chakli) mould using the plate with large holes (if you prefer thinner strands, use the plate with smaller holes) and press like noodles into small circular heaps. 

To make the chunn – heat a pan and add the grated jaggery, add a little water to speed up melting and cook till fully dissolved.  Add the coconut and cook for a minute, then add the cardamom powder and keep aside till required.

To make the sweet milk – Heat the coconut milk till it reaches boiling point and then add the jaggery and simmer till dissolved.  Add cardamom powder, mix and take off heat.

Serve with coconut jaggery filling or sweet coconut milk for breakfast or as teatime snack and with chicken or mutton curry or vegetable stew for lunch or dinner.

Mandas Traditional Mangalore Cucumber Cake


The traditional Mangalorean cucumber cake, both steamed and baked versions.  A favorite cake of the south especially mangaloreans relished by young and old. Also called Tavsali or Tausali from the Konkani name for the local cucumber ‘Tousche’. Other names are Thekkare Adde, Thekkare Ghatti.  Using only raw (white) rice make the cucumber cake quite dense and firm but this texture is preferred by many.  I prefer mixing both raw and boiled rice so that the texture is a bit softer. 

Ingredients

  • 2 cups boiled rice (1 cup basmati + 1 cup boiled)
  • 1 coconut
  • 2 cups jaggery
  • 1 large cucumber
  • 6 cardamoms, powdered
  • Salt to taste
  • ½ cup cashewnuts/almonds (optional)

 Method

  1. Wash and soak the rice for 3 to 4 hours.
  2. Grind to a paste alongwith the coconut, grated cucumber, jaggery and salt.
  3. Add the cardamom powder and let it stand for about an hour.
  4. Add the chopped nuts, if desired.
  5. Bake or steam till done.
  6. To test if the mandas is ready, insert a toothpick or a knife in the center and it should come out clean.
  7.  It really depends on the size of container, thicker the mandas more the time.  Having said that, you can initially steam it for 30 minutes straight, after which you may test with toothpick or a knife and if it comes out clean it’s done.  If not steam further and check at 10 to 15 minute intervals.  The centre should be set and not jiggle.  It firms up further upon cooling. 
  8. Baking takes a fairly longer time about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Baking also renders the mandas a bit hard, hence I prefer steaming.

Mutton Roce Curry (with coconut mik)


Mutton Roce Curry

My Mother’s recipe from her book Mais Recipes – contains 175 more recipes.

Delicious curry will tempt you to drink the curry and lick your fingers.  Traditionally served with Appams, sannas, panpole, etc.  so you can mop the lip smacking curry and enjoy. Same recipe is used to make Chicken Roce Curry.  Please strictly follow the recipe for perfect results.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 kg. mutton
  • 1 cup thick coconut milk (or 1 can 400ml ready coconut milk)
  • 2 medium potatoes (cubed)
  • 1 onion (sliced), 1 tbsp. oil
  • Salt to taste

Roast (each separately) & grind to a paste with a little tamarind

  • 1.5 tbsp. coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp. cumin seeds
  • ½ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. poppy seeds (optional)
  • 1” pc. cinnamon,
  • 4 cloves
  • 10 kashmiri chillies,
  • 8 pepper corns
  • 6 flakes garlic
  • 1 medium onion
  • 4 tbsp. coconut powder

Method

  1. Clean, remove and cut mutton into medium pieces.  Wash and set aside to drain.
  2. Heat oil and fry the sliced onion till light brown.  Add the mutton pieces and fry till it changes color and the water dries up
  3. Add the light coconut milk (optional) or water & bring to a boil.
  4. Reduce heat and simmer until the mutton is tender.
  5. Add the ground masala paste, water for curry as required and when it starts boiling, reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes or till fat surfaces.
  6. Then add the potatoes and cook 10 minutes.
  7. When the potatoes are cooked, add the thick coconut milk, stir well and simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. For extra flavour, garnish the mutton curry with one sliced onion fried to a golden brown in 2 tbsp. oil.


Patoleo made in Banana Leaf


I am putting out this post early so that those who don’t have access to turmeric leaves (traditionally used for patoleos/pathoyos/patolis) can use alternatives rather than dampen the spirit of the celebration. True, the delicious flavour and aroma of turmeric leaves will be sacrificed…. I will just imagine the aroma with every bite of the banana leaf patoleos!

Secondly, many skip making patoleos due to time constraints. In that situation, prepare them on the next weekend, freeze them and steam the patoleos on the day required so you can enjoy them freshly steamed.

August 15 (Independence Day in India) happens to coincide with the Assumption of the Virgin Mary (a Holy day of obligation) and Patoleos are a significant item prepared by Goan & Mangalorean catholics on this day. East Indians call it Pan Mori or East Indian leaf cakes. It is also prepared on St, John’s feast (Sao Joao fest) and Konsachem fest (harvest festival). Ediyos, or Pudde steamed in jackfruit leaves were also prepared on August 15, by my mother.

Konkani hindus prepare patoleos on the second Sunday of Sharavan or Nag Panchami and on Hartalika, the eve of Ganesh Chaturthi. Salt-free patoleos, are offered to Goddess Parvati, who the legends say had a strong craving for these sweets during pregnancy.

If Turmeric leaves are not available in your region, be creative and use any leaves (that can be used for cooking) available near you like banana, fig, bay, maple, teak, corn husks, Okra (Lady finger) leaves, etc. Champa flower leaves are also used for steaming food and enjoy your sweet steamed rice cakes. Be creative and make do with what is available and enjoy rather than omitting your traditional foods altogether!

Patoleo

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup basmati rice
  • 1/2 cup boiled rice
  • 1 cup coconut to grind with rice (optional)
  • 1 ½ cups grated coconut
  • 1 cup jaggery, grated
  • 6 cardamoms, powdered
  • Pinch of salt
  • Fresh haldi (saffron) leaves or any edible available leaves

Method

  • Mix the remaining coconut and jaggery and cook till blended. 
  • Add cardamom powder and mix.
  • Set aside to cool. 
  • Wipe the leaves clean.
  • Apply the rice paste evenly over the leaf taking care to spread in the direction of the ridges of the leaf. This gives a subtle ridged effect to the patoleos when cooked.
  • Spread a tablespoon full or more as required of the coconut jaggery filling over the rice paste on one side of the leaf. 
  • Fold the leaf over and prepare all the patolis in similar manner. 
  • If the leaves are too big, cut the patolis in half or quarters so that they fit comfortably into the steamer. 
  • Put some water into the steamer and bring to a boil.
  • Place the tray and put the patoleos into the steamer. 
  • You can even place them one over the other. 
  • Place the lid on the steamer and steam for 20 to 25 minutes till done. 
  • The leaf will change color and the patolis will be firm. 
  • Remove and enjoy!!

For more post on Patholis:

Patoleo

Tumeric Patoleo leaves

Ediyo – Pudde

Methi Paez


Methi Paez

(Given 8 days after delivery)

Methi Paez – serve a bowl full to the lactating mother for atleast one month, every alternate day, post lunch, starting eight days after delivery!

Cures backache, promotes lactating i.e. increases breast milk, strengthens and helps in bringing back the uterus to its contracted state, relieves flatulence.

Methi paez or fenugreek gruel has several medicinal properties as fenugreek has many nutritional benefits containing fibre, minerals. iron and magnesium, so is beneficial to everyone, not only for lactating mothers

Ingredients

  • 1 cup boiled rice
  • ½ cup methi seeds
  • 1 cup coconut juice
  • Pinch of salt (optional)
  • ¾ cup jaggery

Method

  1. Wash and soak the methi for 4 to 6 hours.
  2. You can soak the boiled rice too, if you wish, separately.
  3. Drain the rice and methi seeds and transfer to utensil.
  4. Add 4 cups water and bring to a boil.
  5. Remove scum from the surface.
  6. Reduce heat and cook till rice and methi are soft, stirring occasionally.
  7. If the water dries out, add a cup or two of water, as per desired consistency.
  8. If you prefer the methi paez thick, avoid using additional water.
  9. Add the jaggery and stir till the jaggery has dissolved.
  10. Then add the coconut milk and simmer for 5 minutes.

Prawn Ghee Roast


Prawn Ghee Roast

Kundapur style

Ghee Roast is fiery red, tangy and spicy with a flavor of ghee roasted spices. The advantage of creating traditional dishes at home, is you can adjust the recipe to suit your taste to get maximum satisfaction from the meal. Our spice level is always medium spicy, hence the Prawn Ghee Roast does not have the usual number of chillies.  Secondly, Baydagi and Kashmiri chillies are both used, but I have used only Kashmiri as I did not have Baydagi chillies. You may increase the chillies according to your taste.

P.S.: Any leftover ghee roast (if at all any remains of this delicious dishes) can be reinvented the next day.  Just add some water when re-heating to make a curry and you have a Kundapur Curry to go with freshly steamed rice!

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup prawns (large), shelled
  • 1 tsp. Kashmiri chilli powder
  • 2 tbsp. yogurt
  • 1tsp. tamarind paste
  • Salt
  • 4 tsp. brown (fried) onion paste*
  • 1 tbsp. yogurt for fried onion paste
  • 6 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. coconut oil
  • 2 tbsp. ghee
  • 1 to 2 sprigs curry leaves

To make Kundapur masala (Roast and grind to a powder)

  • 4 to 6 Kashmiri chillis
  • 1 tbsp. coriander seeds
  • ½ tsp. cumin seeds
  • ¼ tsp. fenugreek seeds
  • ¼ tsp. pepper corns
  • 4 flakes garlic
  • OR use 3 tsp. ready Kundapur masala instead of above

       Method

  1. Dry roast the spices from Kashmiri chillies to garlic, cool and grind to a powder. Your ‘Kundapur masala’ is ready.
  2. *To make fried onion paste : Slice two onions and fry in oil on medium heat till dark brown, cool and grind to a paste with a tbsp. of yogurt.
  3. Clean, shell and devein the prawns. 
  4. Wash, squeeze out all the water. 
  5. Combine tamarind paste, yogurt, salt and kundapur masala and apply to the prawns and mix well.  Marinate for 15 to 30 minutes. 
  6. Take a shallow pan, add 1 tbsp. of coconut oil, and fry the chopped garlic for a minute. 
  7. Add the brown onion paste and sauté for a minute. 
  8. Add the prawns with the marinade and stir fry on high flame till the prawns change colour. 

P.S.: I have cooked a larger quantity in the video, hence it is much more than the recipe quantities.

Sprouted Moong and Jackfruit Seeds Curry


Sprouted Moong (Green Gram) and Jackfruit Seeds (Bikna) Curry

A super easy, quick, delicious and highly nutritious curry.

When I last prepared the sprouted moong bhaji (check  out  the video recipe) I had saved the excess sprouts in the freezer.  The Biknas I had frozen a large batch of boiled jackfruit seeds.  These proved handy when I had to rustle up a quick nutritious meal before rushing to work!

All you need is some steamed rice or chapatis any bread of your choice, with your favorite pickle (aachar).

For a more elaborate meal, serve with fried fish or fish cutlets!!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sprouted moong (green gram)
  • 1 cup boiled jackfruit seeds (Bikna)
  • 1 medium to large Potato (optional), cubed
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 flakes garlic, sliced
  • 1 sprig curry leaves
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • 2 tbsp. Bafat masala, or to taste
  • 4 tbsp. coconut powder
  • 1 tbsp. tamarind pulp
  • 1 tsp. Salt, or to taste
  • 1 tbsp. Oil

Method

  1. Rinse the sprouts and drain.   
  2. In a vessel add oil, when hot add the mustard seeds, when they splutter, add the curry leaves, garlic and onion and saute till onions are light brown. 
  3. Add the bafat masala and fry for ½  a minute. 
  4. Add the moong and and potatoes, if using, and more water, salt and bring to a boil and cook 10 minutes till potatoes are cooked. 
  5. Add the boiled bikna and tamarind pulp and cook 5 minutes. 
  6. Meanwhile dilute the coconut powder with some water and add to the curry, adjust gravy by adding sufficient water. 
  7. Bring to a boil and cook 5 minutes or till fat suraces. 
  8. Serve hot.

Tambdi Bhaji Tel Piyav


Tambdi Bhaji Tel Piyav (Red Amaranth Vegetable)

Ingredients

  • 4 bunches Tambdi Bhaji
  • 1 medium onion
  • 2 red dry chillies
  • 4 flakes garlic
  • ¼ cup fresh coconut
  • 1 tbsp. oil
  • ½ tsp. salt or to taste

Method

  1. Clean the tambdi bhaji, discarding the damaged and insect eaten leaves. 
  2. Save only the clean and complete leaves and the tender stalks.  To find out if the stalks are tender, they should snap easily on breaking. 
  3. Immerse in plenty of salted water and leave for 10 to 15 minutes to loosen the dirt and kill insects if any. 
  4. Slice the onion, crush the garlic, break the red chillies into 2 to 3 pieces and transfer to a cooking vessel.
  5. Wash the soaked bhaji well, drain and chop roughly.
  6. Add the vegetable to the vessel, add salt and oil and 1/4 cup water if desired and place on heat and cook 10 minutes till vegetable is tender.  Stir in between.
  7. Add the fresh coconut, mix and cook further 5 minutes. 
  8. Take off the fire and serve hot.

Hot and Sour Sardines Curry


Hot and Sour Sardines Curry

Hot and Sour Sardines Curry

Tarle Amotik curry (Tallyanchi Kodi)

Ingredients

  • 3 large sardines or 8 to 10 small
  • 1 small onion
  • 2 green chillies
  • 6 kokum petals (dried mangosteen)
  • 10 to 12 Tefla (Indian Prickly Ash)
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste

Grind to a Paste

  • 8 Kashmiri Chillies
  • 2 tbsp. coconut powder (optional)
  • ¼ tsp. cumin seeds
  • ¼ tsp. peppercorns
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 6 flakes garlic
  • A small ball tamarind

Method

  1. Descale the fish, cut off head and tail and remove and discard the intestine, etc. 
  2. Clean and wash well. 
  3. ½ tsp. salt and set aside. 
  4. I have taken 3 large sardines and cut each into half.
  5. Grind the masala to a smooth paste. 
  6. Slice the onion and slit the green chillies. 
  7. Crush the tefla lightly to release the flavor and set aside. 
  8. Take a vessel and add the onion and green chillies.  
  9. No oil is required for this curry. 
  10. Add the masala with the masala water and adjust consistency of the curry (we like it thin). 
  11. Add 1 tsp. salt or to taste.
  12. Place on heat and bring to a boil. 
  13. Add the tefla and kokum pieces.
  14. The tefla add flavor to the curry and not to be consumed.
  15. Reduce flame and simmer 5 minutes. 
  16. Add the fish.  Do not stir to avoid breaking the fish.  Shake the vessel so the fish pieces settle and do not overlap each other. 
  17. Increase flame, bring to a boil, reduce flame and simmer 10 minutes till oil appears on the surface and the curry appears glossy. 
  18. Switch off and serve hot with steamed rice. 

Surnali


Surnali or Surnoli

Surnali (Surnoli)

Buttermilk Dosa, Sponge Dosa, Sweet Dosa, Konkani Pancake, Mangalorean Surnoli, Udupi Surnali, Sweet Surnoli, Plain Surnoli

A Soft and fluffy mangalorean pancake you can make in two ways – Sweet & Plain (Savory) which can be enjoyed for breakfast, as a snack or as an accompaniment with your favorite curry for lunch and dinner.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Idli or basmati Rice
  • 2 cups Buttermilk
  • 1 cup poha
  • ¼ tsp. fenugreek seeds
  • ½ cup coconut
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. Soda bicarb

For sweet version

  • ½ tsp. turmeric
  • ¼ cup jaggery powdered (for half the above quantity of batter)

Method

  1. Wash the rice and fenugreek seeds and soak in buttermilk for atleast 4 hours. 
  2. Soak the poha in water for 15 minutes. 
  3. Grind the rice, poha, coconut to a thick paste. 
  4. As far as possible do not add more water when grinding. 
  5. Add salt to the batter and divide into two. 
  6. To one half, add turmeric powder and jaggery and mix well till jaggery is dissolved.
  7. Leave both the batters to ferment 8 hours or overnight. 
  8. Before frying you may add a pinch or ¼ tsp. soda bicarb to the batter (If the batter has not fermented well) and mix.  This is optional.
  9. You may thin down the batter slightly, if required by adding little water if batter is too thick.
  10. To fry, heat a dosa pan very hot, smear with oil using an onion, put two ladles of batter (3/4 cup), do not spread. 
  11. Cover and cook till it is covered with holes, becomes opaque and light brown on the edges.  (Suruli for holes in Konkani).
  12. Remove and serve the sweet Surnalis with butter
  13. And the plain or savory ones with chutney.
  14. Also enjoy them with your favorite curry for lunch or dinner.

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