Vegetarian

Mixed Vegetable Pulao


Mixed Vegetable Pulao

Using frozen mixed vegetables

Ingredients

  • 2 cups basmati rice
  • 1 cup frozen mixed vegetables
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 2 stock cubes (chicken or vegetable)
  • 2to 3 sticks cinnamon
  • 5 cardamoms
  • 8 cloves
  • 2 tbsp. ghee
  • 4 cups hot water
  • ½ tsp. turmeric powder
  • ½ tsp. salt or to taste

Method

  1. Wash rice and soak in water for atleast 15 mns. 
  2. Heat a pot, add ghee and fry the onion, on medium flame. 
  3. Add the whole cinnamom, cardamom & cloves and saute till onion turns light brown. 
  4. Add the stock cubes and stir until it dissolves, add the frozen vegetable and saute for 2 minutes. 
  5. Add the drained rice and gently mix till the rice grains are coated with ghee and fluff up a bit. 
  6. Add the hot water, turmeric powder, optional if you want to leave the pulao white.
  7. Add salt to taste, it will already have some salt due to the stock cubes. Stir, bring to a boil. 
  8. Cover and reduce flame and cook. 
  9. Stir once in between to mix.
  10. Cook till water is completely absorbed. 
  11. Serve hot with raita, yogurt, pickle, dahi curry or at any festive meal.

Mooli Rotis


Mooli Ki roti

These are not the usual Mooli Parathas but more like theplas, usually served at mealtimes but can be enjoyed for breakfast or as a teatime snack with a hot cup of tea or coffee.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups grated raddish
  • 4 cups wheat flour
  • 2 tsp. ginger-garlic paste
  • 2 tsp chilli powder
  • 1 tsp. ajwain
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • Ghee for smearing the rotis

Method

  1. Peel, clean and wash the mooli (raddish).
  2. Mix all the above and and knead to a soft dough. 
  3. Divide into equal portions (about 15 to 18) and roll into a circle as thin as possible dusting some flour to prevent it sticking.
  4. Cook the roti to a golden brown on a hot griddle (tava) on both sides applying some ghee on both sides. 
  5. Serve hot with lunch or dinner or for breakfast with yogurt, pickle.

Cooking with drumstick leaves


Enjoy healthy and nutritious drumstick leaves, popularly known as ‘Moringa leaves’ which are a powerhouse of nutrition. There are several ways to cook drumstick leaves some of which are herebelow. We used to have plenty of the drumstick trees around our houses and don’t think our mothers ever had to purchase drumsticks or the leaves for cooking.

As they are currently available in the market decided to make a few dishes and post recipes.

  1. Drumstick Leaves Adai
Drumstick Leaves Adai

2. Drumstick Leaves & Potato Bhaji

Drumstick Leaves & Potato Bhaji

3. Drumstick Leaves Tel Piyav

Drumstick Leaves Tel Piyav

Ponsa Muddo


These cakes are usually steamed in teak leaves, which impart a unique fragrance and reddish color to the cake. In the absence of teak leaves here, I have used banana leaves but would surely use teak leaves whenever I can get some and re-post the pictures. Canned jackfruit has been used in this recipe.

Ponsache Patoleo – Jackfruit cakes steamed in banana leaves (Pelakai da ghatti in Tulu)

Ponsa Muddo

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: Average
  • Print

  • 2 cups Jackfruit, chopped
  • 2 cups  white rice (or rice rava)
  • ¼ cup coconut
  • Jaggery 1/4 cup, or as required (may be omitted if jackfruit is extra sweet)
  • Salt to taste.
  • 8 Teak leaves (or 5 to 6 banana leaves cut into  medium sized pieces)
  1. Wash and soak rice for 4 to 6 hours or overnight.
  2. Grind along with jackfruit, coconut and jaggery to a very thick paste using very little water. Add salt.
  3. If using rice rava, soak for 15 minutes. Grind the jackfruit, coconut, jaggery to a paste and mix  with the rava.
  4. Place 2 ladles (or more depending on the size of the leaf) and fold into  a packet and place in steamer, seam side down and steam for 30 minutes.  Cooking time would vary according to size and thickness of the jackfruit cake.
  5. Remove and cut into pieces, if cakes are large.
  6. Serve for breakfast or as tea-time snack.  Also goes well with curries on festival menus.

Sheera


Sheera – Sooji Halwa

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Rawa
  • 1/2 cup Sugar
  • 1/4 cup Ghee
  • 4 cups hot water
  • Few drops yellow color
  • 1/4 cup Almonds and pistas (for garnish)
  • 2 tbsp. cashewnuts
  • 2 tbsp. Raisins
  • 1/4 tsp.Cardamom powder (optional)
  1. Slice the almonds and pistas. Clean the raisins, removing stems if any.
  2. Heat ghee in a kadai and fry the raisins till they swell.  Remove and set aside. Fry the cashewnuts lightly and remove.
  3. Add the rawa to the kadai and fry on medium low flame till it turns light brown and you get a nice aroma. Takes about 15 to 20 minutes. You can fry it longer if you prefer it nice and brown. Do not fry on high flame or the rawa will get burnt ruining the sheera.
  4. Add the hot water and stir quickly to avoid lumps being formed.
  5. Add the saffron and stir and mix well. When the rawa thickens add the sugar and mix till dissolved.
  6. Then add the nuts and raisins. Keep stirring till it begins to leave the sides of the kadai and forms a ball.
  7. Put into bowls and press lightly and turn out onto a serving plate. Garnish with nuts and serve hot.
  8. Avoided saffron (kesar), but intend to make kesari baath soon, going all out with the ghee and sugar in equal quantities to the rava!!

Panchmel Dal


Panchrattan Pakwan

Punj Rattani Dal –

Dal made with a combination of five lentils and tempering with combination of five spices and condiments. Also referred to as “Panch Rattan Pakwan”.

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp. Moong (whole)
  • 2 tbsp. Masoor (Whole)
  • 2 tbsp. Urad dal (preferably whole)
  • 2 tbsp. Chana dal
  • 2 tbsp. Tur dal
  • 2” sticks cinnamon
  • 1 tbs. coriander powder
  • 1 tsp. cumin powder
  • ½ tsp. chilli powder
  • ½ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • ½ cup coriander leaves
  • 1 tbsp. cream (optional)

Tempering #1

  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1″ pc ginger, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 tbsp. yogurt
  • ½ tsp garam masala

Tempering #2

  • 1 tsp oil or ghee
  • 1/2 tsp. each black cumin, kalonji (onion seeds), methi (fenugreek), saunf (fennel), mustard seeds
  • 2 red chillies

Method

  1. Wash lentils and soak in water for one hour. 
  2. Chop onions, tomatoes and coriander leaves.
  3. Cook the lentils with 8 cups water & 2 sticks cinnamon.   
  4. Bring to a boil, remove scum if any, reduce flame. 
  5. Add coriander, cumin, red chilli and turmeric powders and salt. 
  6. Cover and simmer till cooked and most of the liquid has evaporated.
  7. Mash the dals lightly again the sides of the vessel with a wooden spoon. 
  8. Tempering  #1 : Heat a pan and add butter, onions, ginger, tomatoes, yogurt and garam masala, stir over medium heat till fat leaves the mixture.  Pour over the dal and mix well. Cook 5 mns.
  9. Tempering #2 : Heat ghee, add all the five seeds, break the red chillies and saute till they crackle and add to the dal.
  10. Stir in malai. 
  11. Serve hot garnished with coriander leaves with rotis, phulkas or steamed rice.

Brinjal Pakoras


Brinjal Pakoras

Brinjals or aubergines or eggplants as they are called are a very versatile vegetable and a universal favorite, available roundthe year. They are delicious fried as pakoras, bhajias, stuffed with mince or green chutney masala (these recipes are in the book Mai’s recipes). The brinjal bharta and brinjal pickle are famous and so is the turkish recipe Imam Bayildi

Ingredients

  • 6 medium brinjals (or two large)
  • 1 ½ cups besan (gram flour)
  • ¼ tsp. soda bircarb (optional)
  • 1 tsp. carom seeds (ajwain)
  • 2 tsp. chilli powder or to taste
  • 1 ½ tsp. amchur (dry mango powder) or pomegranate seeds powder
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste
  • 1 ½ cups water
  • Oil for shallow frying

Method

  1. Slice the medium brinjals horizontally.  If large cut into round slices.
  2. Mix the gram flour, soda bicarb, ajwain, chilli powder, amchur, salt to taste and make a batter with 1 cup water.
  3. Add some more water if batter is too thick. 
  4. Batter should coat the brinjals without dripping. 
  5. At the same time the coating should not be too thick. 
  6. Shallow fry to golden brown on both sides in hot oil. 
  7. Serve hot with ketchup, mint sauce, chilli garlic sauce or any sauce of your choice. 
  8. Make into sandwiches with bread or pita bread or rolled into a chapati for breakfast, packed lunch or a snack.

Cluster Beans in yogurt gravy


Cluster Beans in Yogurt gravy

Gavar or Cluster beans have only limited ways of preparation and are usually cooked by us with prawns and potatoes as the vegetable by itself is quite bland and sometimes has a bitter after taste. Hence it is usually cooked with a lot of spices to make the vegetable more tasty and palatable. This recipe with yogurt and spice powders makes it quiet tangy and savoury and goes well with rotis. If you wish to use over steamed rice, add a little more water to make the gravy lighter.

An excellent vegetable, the more tender the better as the mature beans render thick stems on either side of the bean which must be removed before cooking.

Gavar dahi sabji

Ingredients

  • ½ kg. Cluster Beans (Gavar)
  • ½ tsp. mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp. Cumin seeds
  • ¼ tsp. asafoetida (hing)
  • 1 tsp. fennel seeds (saunf)
  • 1 sprig curry leaves
  • 1 cup yogurt
  • 1 tbsp. coriander powder
  • 2 tsp. chilli powder
  • 2 tsp. gram flour (Bengal gram flour)
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • Salt to taste

Method

  1. Remove head and tail and string the cluster beans. 
  2. Instead of cutting the beans, break into pieces with your hands while stringing the pieces. 
  3. Boil the beans for 10 to 15 minutes, with ½ tsp. salt till cooked. 
  4. Drain the water and keep aside. 
  5. Mix the yogurt with the coriander powder, chillie powder, gram flour and ½ tsp salt and beat well. 
  6. Heat a vessel, add 2 tbsp. oil, add mustard, cumin and fennel seeds, asafoetida. 
  7. When the seeds crackle, add the yogurt masala mixture and cook till oil separates. 
  8. Add the curry leaves and mix, cook for a minute, add ¼ cup water, mix and bring to a boil. 
  9. Simmer for 5 minutes, stirring at intervals. 
  10. Add the cooked beans, mix and simmer 5 minutes. 
  11. Check seasoning. 
  12. Serve hot with any Indian bread.

Radish Vegetable


Raddish Vegetable

Radish is in season in winters and an excellent way to add fibre and nutrients to your diet. Radish also helps in fighting cough and cold. Have your tried eating fresh radish marinated in vinegar? If you have a blocked nose, it provides instant relief. East Indians make a lamb curry with radish called Lonvas using east indian bottle masala. Turns out delicious. Mooli parathas a North Indian speciality are famous all over. So enjoy the goodness of radish this winter.

Radish Vegetable (Moolo Bhaji)

Ingredients

  • 1 large bunch radishes with leaves
  • 1 onion sliced
  • 2 red chillies
  • 4 flakes garlic
  • ¼ cup fresh coconut
  • 1 tbsp. coconut oil
  • 1 tsp. salt

Method

  1. Clean the radish by discarding the yellow and stained leaves and reserve the tender and unblemished leaves.
  2. Peel the radish
  3. Place everything in salted water for 10 minutes. 
  4. Drain an rinse well. 
  5. Chop the leaves and slice the radish into thin slices.
  6. Heat the oil in a pan, add the crushed garlic, and red chillies broken into half. Saute a few seconds. 
  7. Add the sliced onion and toss, then add the vegetable, salt, cover and cook 5 to 7 minutes. 
  8. Not necessary to add water as the vegetable releases water. 
  9. However, half way through cooking if the water has dried up, add a quarter cup of water, cover and cook till the radish is tender. 
  10. Add the coconut, mix and cook further 2 minutes. 
  11. Remove and serve hot as accompaniment with Rice curry or serve with rotis. 
  12. Makes a light and healthy dinner with just chapatis (rotis) and moolo bhaji.

Valchi Bhaji Tel Piyav


Valchi Bhaji Tel Piyav

Valchi Bhaji (Malabar Spinach or Buffalo Spinach)

Always a delight to lay hands on fresh and tender valchi bhaji in this part of the world. In India it is grown in home gardens and easily available. A very simple and easy way to cook is just steaming it with oil, garlic, chillies and onion and garnished with fresh coconut and hence referred to as “Tel Piyav”. Other variations of cooking this spinach is a curry with shrimp or with tur dal or black-eyed beans for a vegetarian version.

Thoroughly enjoyed the vegetable with a meal of steamed rice, raw mango curry and lady fish fry!!

Ingredients

  • 1 Large Bunch Valchi Bhaji about 1 kg.
  • 1 Onion
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 2 green chillies
  • ¼ cup fresh coconut
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 tbsp. coconut oil

Method

  1. Clean the valchi bhaji.  Separate the leaves from the thick stems, the tender stems keep with the leaves.
  2. Cut stems into large pieces, keep the leaves whole  and soak in salted water for 10 minutes to loosen dirt & kill insects if any. 
  3. Drain, rinse in clean water and drain again. 
  4. Chop the thick stems, tender stems and leaves into 1” pieces. 
  5. Transfer the vegetable to a cooking pot.
  6. Slice the onion, slit the green chillies and crush the garlic and add to the vegetable alongwith the salt and oil. 
  7. Keep on medium flame and cook 10 minutes until stems are tender.
  8. Not necessary to add water as the vegetable will leave water while cooking. 
  9. Add the fresh coconut and cook 3 to 5 minutes. 
  10. Serve hot. 
  11. Makes a very healthy and satisfying addition to any main meal.
Valchi Bhaji Tel Piyav

Rava Upma


Rava Upma

Rava Upma

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Quick Savoury Breakfasts

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Rava (Semolina)
  • 2 tbsp. cashewnuts
  • 2 tbsp. yogurt
  • 1 Onion
  • 2 green chillies
  • ½” piece ginger
  • 1 tsp. urad dal
  • 1 tsp. gram dal
  • ½ tsp mustard seeds
  • 4 small bay leaves
  • 1 sprig curry leaves
  • 3 tbsp. ghee
  • Salt to taste
  • 4 cups water

Method

  1. Heat 1 tbsp. ghee in a kadai and roast the rava on low heat
  2. Meanwhile, chop the onion, green chillies and ginger. 
  3. When the rava turns light brown, remove and set aside. 
  4. Add 2 tbsp. ghee to the kadai and fry the cashewnuts till they change color. Remove. 
  5. Add the mustard seeds, when they splutter add the urad and gram dal and saute. 
  6. Add the curry leaves, ginger, green chillies, and saute few seconds.
  7. Then add the onion and bay leaves and fry till onions turn soft. 
  8. Add the yogurt and salt and stir to mix well. 
  9. Add 4 cups water, stir and bring to a boil. 
  10. When it comes to a rolling boil, reduce heat and add the Rava. 
  11. Mix well to dissolve lumps if any. 
  12. Stir and cook covered till all the water is absorbed. 
  13. Open, stir and cook till mixture turns dry and thick and leaves the side of the kadai. 
  14. Add the cashewnuts, mix and turn off the heat. 
  15. Serve hot plain or with chutney for breakfast or tea-time snack.

Traditional Cucumber Karam


Traditional Cucumber Karam

Traditional Cucumber Karam

  • Servings: 6-10
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Traditional Karam Cucumber Coconut Salad – Thousyache Karam

Ingredients

  • 2 Large cucumbers
  • 2 medium onions
  • Salt to taste
  • Grind to a paste
  • 1 cup fresh coconut
  • 2 green chillies or to taste
  • ½” piece ginger
  • 3 to 4 pieces of tamarind
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • ½ tsp salt, if required.

Method

  1. Cucumbers used for this recipe are the local cucumbers (we call it gaunti toushe).
  2. Wash, peel and remove the seeds of the cucumbers. 
  3. Cut into thick slices. 
  4. Add a tsp of salt, mix and set aside for 10 to 15 minutes. 
  5. The cucumbers will release water.
  6. Squeeze out the water and transfer to a serving bowl. 
  7. Slice the onion horizontally into thick slices and mix with the cucumber. 
  8. Grind the coconut, green chillies, ginger, tamarind and mustard seeds to a coarse paste with a little water. 
  9. Add ½ tsp salt if required. 
  10. Mix the ground paste with the cucumber onion mixture and combine well with your hands. 
  11. Serve cold. 

This is a traditional Mangalorean salad, served on all festive and celebratory occasions.  A must item for the “Novem Jevon” which is celebrated on 8th September, to celebrate the nativity of our Blessed Mother Mary and the blessing of the new harvest i.e. the grains of paddy.

Wishing one & all a Happy Feast!

Here are other dishes that make up the “Novem Jevon” menu:

  1. Sannas
  2. Chana Bhaji
  3. Alun Dento
  4. Karatein Sukhe (Karela vegetable)
  5. Raw Banana Bhaji
  6. Moong Sukha
  7. Kaane Fish curry
  8. Pathrode
  9. Vorn

The dishes can be any variety and any number but must be in odd number. Sannas, Alun Dento, Karatein Sukhe, Chana Bhaji, Vorn are commonly prepared. Understand Udupi and Kundapur side, fish curry alongwith veg dishes are prepared, but proper Managalore side it is only vegetarian preparations.

Cooking with Raw Bananas


Enjoy the goodness and health of Raw Bananas by including them in your diet. Easily available throughout the year. Here are three delicious and easy recipes to try out.

Stuffed Raw Bananas

Stuffed Raw Bananas

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 4 Big Raw Bananas
  • ¼ cup coconut
  • 4 green chillies
  • ½ cup coriander leaves
  • ½ tsp. mustard seeds
  • 2 to 3 red chillies
  • ½ tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. Salt or to taste
  • Half lemon juice

Method

  1. Peel the bananas and soak in water to prevent oxidation and turning black.
  2. Cut the bananas into 2 inch pieces lengthwise. 
  3. Cut each piece into half, halfway down the centre. 
  4. Grind together coconut, green chillies and coriander leaves. 
  5. Mix in salt, turmeric and lemon juice.
  6. Stuff the paste into the bananas. 
  7. Heat 1 tbsp. Oil or ghee and put in mustard seeds and red chillies. 
  8. When the seeds stop popping, put in the bananas. 
  9. Cover tightly and cook till bananas are done. 
  10. Serve hot.

Raw Banana Fry

Raw Banana Fry

Raw Banana Fry

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 4 Raw Bananas
  • ½ tsp ginger garlic paste
  • 1 to 2 tbsp. Vinegar or Lemon juice, or to taste
  • ½ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. chilli powder or to taste
  • 3 to 4 tbsp. rice flour
  • 2 tbsp. corn flour
  • Salt to taste
  • ¼ cup curry leaves for garnish
  • Oil for frying

Method

  1. Peel the bananas and soak in water to prevent them turning black.
  2. Slice the Bananas horizontally into thin slices. 
  3. Mix the ginger garlic paste, chilli & turmeric powder, rice flour, corn flour, vinegar and salt and make a thick paste using as much water as required.
  4. Mix the slices with the batter. 
  5. Heat oil for deep frying, when hot reduce flame and fry in small batches till crisp and golden.
  6. Drain on kitchen towel. 
  7. Fry the curry leaves in the hot oil for a minute and remove.
  8. Garnish the fried bananas with the curry leaves and serve as a side with a main meal or with tomato ketchup as a snack or appetizer.

P.S.: The same batter can be used to fry arbi, egg plant, zucchini, bread fruit, potatoes, yam, mushrooms, etc.

Raw Banana Bhaji

Raw Banana Bhaji

Click on the above link for the recipe.

15 Minute Breakfast Recipes


Leftover Dosa Upma

Leftover Dosa Upma

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

A simple and easy upma recipe to use-up leftover dosas, sannas, idlis, etc. Similar Upma can even be made of leftover bread. Transforms into a completely new and delicious dish which you will certainly enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup yogurt
  • 2 cups Dosa, chopped into pieces
  • 2 green chillies, chopped
  • ½ tsp mustard seeds
  • 1tsp. urad dal
  • 2 tbsp. coriander, chopped
  • Few curry leaves
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp. ghee

Method

  1. Beat the yogurt and add the dosa pieces and set aside. 
  2. Heat a kadai, add the ghee, when hot add the mustard seeds and allow to splutter
  3. Add the urad dal, let it turn lightly brown.
  4. Add the curry leaves and green chillies. 
  5. Saute lightly. 
  6. Add turmeric and the marinated dosa pieces. 
  7. Mix well and heat through. 
  8. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves.
  9. Serve hot for breakfast or as tea-time snack or a mid-morning snack.

Check-out more fifteen minute recipes:-

  1. Vermicelli Upma
  2. Bacon & Eggs
  3. Low Carb Toad in a Hole
  4. Egg Roll
  5. Toad in a Hole
  6. Egg Omlette with Cherry Tomatoes
  7. French Toast
  8. Rava Adai
  9. Poha Upma
Poha Upma

Cooking with Taro


Songe-Réunion.JPG
Taro (Colacasia) Plants

Taro croms (root) is also known as Arbi, Ghuiya, Colacasia root. The leaves are called colacasia leaves, Alun leaves, Pathra leaves. The root, stems and leaves are edible but should not be consumed raw as it containes toxic substances which are neutralised by cooking.

Taro is a tropical plant and consumption of both its root and leaves have many benefits namely, reduces infammation, controls cholestrol, boosts immunity amongst other benefits.

Available in abundance during the monsoons in India. It is also grown in African, Oceanic, Pacific and South Asian countries throughout the year. It is easily available in Indian, East Asian and Latin American Markets around the world and comes in various sizes from small to medium to large. When choosing Taro croms, pick those that seem heavy for their size, are firm and the hairy skin looks somewhat moist.

Taro Roots or Arbi can be prepared into various tasty snacks and vegetables, a few of which are mentioned below. Apply some oil on your hands when handling Arbi or wear gloves as it leaves a sticky liquid.

  1. Arbi Kofta with mint yogurt dip
  2. Arbi Makhani
  3. Arbi fry
  4. Arbi Tuk

Taro or Colacasia leaves – also known as Colacasia leaves, Alun leaves, Pathra leaves, have an abundance of benefits and are most commonly used in the traditional mangalorean Pathrode and the famous gujarati snack Pathra (Alu Vadi). The stems of the leaves are also used in cooking and we usually make a curry by adding some legumes, etc.

  1. Alu Vadi
  2. Pathrode
  3. Alun stem with Alsande Curry
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Alu Vadi
107 Pathrade
Pathrode
Alun Stem with Alasande (Red Kidney beans) and Ambade curry

It is beneficial to eat local and seasonal produce. Not only is it cheaper but also fresh as it is grown in local farms and the supply does not require transportation over days and weeks to long distances therefore the produce reaches markets quicker thereby preserving its nutritional value. Besides the nutrients lost due to contamination from pesticides etc. is eliminated as most local produce is grown organically. Any seasonal produce is naturally good as it supports the body’s nutritional requirements. Buying local produce also supports the local farmer.

Read my post on Cooking with Spinach for recipes using spinach.

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