Goan traditional food

How to cean and cook Terem Leaves Alun Leaves and Alsande curry


How to clean and cook Terem leaves

Also called Taro, Alu, Colocassia, Pathra leaves are high in nutrition and Iron rich.  Available in plenty in the monsoon, they grow abundantly in and around gardens and fields and along the roadside where there is plenty of greenery.  However it is only the leaves that have red/purple stems that are edible and those that have green stems cannot be consumed.

Terem/Taro/Alu leaves and Alssone Curry

Ingredients

15 Terem leaves and 3 to 4 stems

1 cup Alsande/Alsone beans (or 15 jackfruit seeds or 1 cup Black eyed beans)

1 cup fresh grated coconut

1 tsp. cumin seeds

1 tsp. mustard seeds

1 tsp. turmeric powder

1” pc cinnamon stick

2 cloves

2 red chillies

5 flakes garlic

1 medium onion

2 medium tomatoes

8 Kokum petals

1 tsp. Salt or to taste

2 tbps. Coconut oil

Wash the leaves well and wash and peel the stems.  Chop finely.  Apply some oil on your hands or wear gloves to avoid the itchy feeling on your hands post cleaning.  Slice the onion and tomatoes and keep aside. Wash and boil the alsone beans till tender.  Add salt and then add the chopped terem leaves and stem and cook 10 minutes.  Meanwhile, dry roast the fresh coconut and grind with the cumin, mustard, chillies, garlic, turmeric cinnamon and cloves to a smooth paste.  Take another vessel and when hot, add the oil and fry the sliced onion till light brown.  Then add the tomatoes and when soft add the ground masala paste and sautee for 3 minutes.  Add the kokum petals. Then add the boiled alsone and terem leaves to the gravy alongwith water from the rinsed masala jar and additional water if thinner gravy is required.  Adjust seasoning and cook 15 minutes till oil surfaces.  Remove to a serving dish and serve hot with rice or poee or any bread for a sumptuous and healthy local and seasonal meal, protein and iron rich!!

Sorpotel and Sannas Combo Traditional Goan and Manglorean festive meal


Sarapatel or Sorpotel, is a dish of Portuguese origin now commonly cooked in the coastal konkan region of India, primarily Goa, Mangalore and East Indians of Mumbai Sarpatel. The former Estado da Índia Portuguesa colony. It is also prepared in northeastern Brazil. The word ‘sarapatel’ literally means confusion, referring to the mish-mash of ingredients which include Pork meat and offal (which includes heart, liver, tongue and even pork blood sometimes). However, in modern-day version, blood is rarely used as now getting the pure blood is slightly difficult. The meat is first parboiled, then diced and sauteed before being cooked in a spicy and vinegary sauce.

The flavourings and spices differ from region to region, for example, some use more vinegar. The size of the pieces also varies, as does cooking technique: some sautee the meat prior to cooking it in the sauce, while others add the diced parboiled meat directly to the sauce.

In Goa and Mangalore, Sorpotel is often accompanied by “sanna” – a spongy, white, and slightly sweet steamed rice and coconut bread. However, it can also be enjoyed with bread, on rice, or in a bun as a sandwich.

Made by African slaves in Brazil, the dish had the tail, ear, intestines, tongue and a hint of blood. It was a filling, rich ode to offal. The pork-loving Portuguese got it to India. What came to India was the version popular from Alentejo region of Portugal, to which the native Goan Christians and East Indians added their own tricks to make it even more interesting. It is this variety that is available today. Source – Wikipedia

Sorpotel

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Kg. Fatty Pork (Belly preferably). If using Pork Liver, use 1 Kg pork and ½ kg liver (I have not used liver as it’s not available here)
  • 2 Large onions, minced
  • 2 tsp. salt or to taste

Grind to a paste with vinegar

  • 1.5 cups vinegar
  • 25 Kashmiri Red chilies
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • 8 to 10 pepper corns
  • 1/2 tsp. Turmeric powder
  • 1 to 2 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 24 flakes garlic
  • 4” pc. Ginger
  • 4” pc. Cinnamon
  • 8 cardamoms
  • 8 cloves

Clean and wash pork (and liver if using) and cut into large pieces.  Heat the pork on  pan and fry for 10 minutes to release the fat, turning the pieces.  Do not add any additional oil. Drain the pork and keep the fat aside. 

Add the pork pieces to a large pan, add salt and enough water to cover the meat and bring to a boil.  Reduce flame and cook 30 minutes till meat is almost done.  Remove from heat, drain and reserve the stock. 

When meat is cool enough to handle, chop into tiny pieces.  If using liver, chop and keep the pork and liver pieces separate.  Do not mix them at this stage. Heat the pan again and add the fat which was set aside.  Add the chopped pork and fry for 10 minutes till light brown.  Drain and remove. Then add the liver pieces and fry 2 to 3 minutes, drain and remove. 

To the same pan, add the minced onion and fry till light brown.  Then add the ground paste and fry 2 to 3 minutes,  add pork and liver pieces and continue frying for 5 minutes.  Add the reserved stock and more water for the gravy and bring to a boil, cover and simmer till meat is tender.  Check seasonings and add salt, vinegar, as required.  Add water to thin down the gravy. 

Enjoy with Sannas, steamed rice, bread, poee or Fugias. For those who don’t eat pork, try this recipe with lamb or chicken liver…… delicious.

Sannas

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Idli Rice
  • 1 cup fresh grated coconut
  • Coconut water or Toddy as required to grind the batter
  • 1 tsp. salt  or to taste
  • ¾ tsp. active dry yeast
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 2 tbsp. luke warm water

Method

Wash and soak rice overnight.  Grind with the coconut using coconut water or toddy, in 2 batches to a smooth paste of pouring consistency (not too thick). 

Bloom the yeast by adding the yeast to a mug, then add the sugar and lukewarm water, stir well, cover and leave aside for 10 minutes.  Once it blooms add to the rice batter and mix and beat the batter well with your hand.  In warm weather the batter should ferment in 2 to 3 hours.  In cold weather will take longer. 

When batter is fermented, set the steamer on heat.  Grease the sanna molds and fill them half way with batter allowing room for the sanna to rise.  Steam for 20 to 25 minutes.  After 20 minutes pierce a thoothpick in the sanna and it should come out clean, if not steam for another 5 minutes and test. 

Transfer the sannas to a water bath to cool slightly.  Demould with a butter knife, back of a spoon or simply pull them away from the edges with your fingers.  Place in a casserole spread with a muslin cloth or a wooden bowl or tray to prevent the warm sannas from sticking to the base. 

Enjoy for breakfast with a dollop of ghee or butter or with Sorpotel, any Pork curry or chicken or mutton curry.

The video is full of tips and steps for the perfect Sorpotel texture and taste and soft and spongy sannas!!

If you don’t have a steamer, cook your Sannas in an Oven. Check out the video below.

Banana Muluks Banana Semolina Jaggery Balls


Kele Mulik Recipe – Konkani Banana Modak Recipe – Ganesh Chaturthi Special Recipes – Kela Muluk (Banana Sweet Dish), Kela Fritters.

Known by several names, this quick recipe is easy, simple and delicious.  Don’t ever throw away leftover bananas, when you can use them to make these crunchy, crispy, scrumptious muluks!!

Makes 12 to 14 lemon sized Muluks

Ingredients

  • 2 medium ripe bananas, mashed
  • ½ cup coconut fresh or dessicated coconut
  • ½ cup jaggery
  • Pinch of salt
  • Cardamom powder
  • Rawa as much as required to make a smooth dough

Mash the bananas well, add the coconut and jaggery and mix well ensuring the jaggery is melted.  Add salt and cardamom powder and add rawa as much as required to make a smooth soft dough.  Set aside for 15 minutes.  Heat oil in a wok, when hot add spoonful of dough or form soft balls by hand and drop gently  into the pan.  Fry on medium low till golden brown and cooked through.  Remove and serve immediately.

Banana flower Bhaji / Kel Phoolache Bhaji / Banana Blossom Stir fry


Banana blossom, Banana flower or banana heart, is the end of the stem holding the bunch of bananas. It is tropical vegetable used in Asian cooking and is available worldwide in Asian and Indian grocery stores year round. Banana flowers are high in vitamins A and C and have modest amounts of calcium and iron.  They are a good source of fibre. Banana flowers are commonly used as vegetables for cooking in countries such as Laos, India, Thailand, China, Burma, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam,

Ingredients

  • 1 Banana Blossom, cleaned and chopped
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • 1 tbsp. urad dal (split black gram)
  • 1 tbsp. chana dal (split Bengal gram)
  • 2 medium onions
  • 3 top 4 garlic, chopped
  • 2 green chilies, chopped
  • 3 to 4 Kokum petals (Mangosteen)
  • 1/4 tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1.5 tsp. salt or to taste
  • ¼ cup fresh grated coconut
  • ¼ cup fresh coriander
  • ½ cup butter milk

Preparing the banana blossom for cooking and a bit tedious and lengthy process, but totally worth it. Before cleaning the blossom, apply oil to your palms and fingers to avoid them becoming sticky and black from the sap.  Also makes it easier to wash-off.

First cut-off the tip and the stem so removal of the leaves (bracts) becomes easier. Remove the deep crimson outer bracts from banana blossoms.  Beneath each bract is a row of fronds/florets, remove and set aside. These are the male flowers that did not grow into bananas. Thus continue till you reach the inner petals, or bracts, which are the edible parts. Clean the florets by looking for the Calyx (the small petal in the front) and the Pistil (the long stem with a head like a matchstick).  Remove these as they don’t cook.  Discard the crimson bracts and the pistil and calyx.  You may reserve two to three clean and deep colored bracts to serve the bhaji and use them as decorative plates to enhance presentation.

Then take a bowl of water and add ½ cup butter milk and mix.  Chop the heart and florets finely and immediately immerse in the diluted butter milk till required to prevent oxidation and discoloration.

To cook, boil water in a vessel and add the chopped vegetable and cook 10 minutes, adding 1 tsp. Salt.  Strain in a sieve or colander and keep aside. Chop the onion, garlic and green chillies.  Heat oil in a vessel, when hot add the mustard seeds, when they crackle, add the urad dal and the chana dal.  Saute till light brown.  Then add the curry leaves and kokum, garlic and green chillies.  Fry 30 seconds and add the onions and fry till translucent.  Add ½ tsp. salt and ½ tsp. turmeric powder and mix well.  Add the boiled banana blossom, ½ cup water, mix.  Cover and cook 5 to 7 minutes.  Stir at intervals.  Then add the fresh coconut and cook 2 minutes. Add 1/4 cup coriander leaves chopped, reserve some for garnish.  Mix well, take off flame and serve hot with chapatis, neer dosa, panpole or with rice as an accompaniment.  Tastes great with any Indian bread.

Choris Chilly fry Goa Sausage chilli fry Choris Pao


Goan Sausage (Choris) Chilli Fry

The deicious and tantalizing Goa sausages and the famous Choris Pao, a universal favorite, prepared from a simple sausage chilli fry.  The sausages have all the spices required, all that is needed is some onion and potato (if you wish) to prepare this dish.  The taste and flavor of the cooked sausage chilli fry is directly related to the quality of sausages.  So do take care to source the best ones you can find!

Ingredients

  • 20 small beads Goan Sausages (or 10 large ones)
  • 3 to 4 medium onions, as required
  • 1 medium potato (optional)

Remove the string and remove the casing of the sausages.  Some even like to keep the thread and casing and simple cut the sausages strands into 2” pcs.  In this case wash the outer casing of the sausages before using.

Clean and slice the onions roughly into thick slices/pieces.  Peel, wash and chop potato into cubes.  Add the sausages, onions and potato to a vessel.  Barely cover with water and keep on flame and bring to a boil.  Stir at intervals.  Cook till water has almost dried, just a little should remain for gravy.  Serve hot with pao or pulao.

Choris Pulao Goa Sausage Pulao


Chorisan are synonymous with Goa!

The Goa sausages famous all over the world, cooked and added to rice for a spicy, tangy, delicious pulao.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Basmati rice
  • 30 small beads goa sausages (chorisan)
  • 3 medium onions
  • 6 cloves
  • 6 cardamoms
  • ½ tsp. whole peppercorns
  • 2”  sticks cinnamon
  • 2 stock cubes, any flavour (I used chicken)
  • ½ tsp. salt or to taste
  • 2 tbsp. Oil

Wash and soak the rice, till required.  Cut the thread of the sausage beads and slit the casing to remove completely.  Keep the sausage meat aside.  Clean and slice the onions.  Heat oil in a vessel and add the onions, fry till translucent.  Add the sausage meat and 1 cup water and cook 15 to 20 minutes till all the water is absorbed and sausages are tender.   Take a larges vessel to cook the pulao.  Add 4 cups water, peppercorns, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon and the stock cubes.  Add ½ tsp. salt to taste.  When the water starts boiling and the stock cubes are dissolved, add the soaked drained rice.  Mix well and cover.  When it begins boiling, reduce to low flame and cook till water is half absorbed.  Then add the cooked sausages and mix well gently.  Cover and continue cooking on low till all the moisture is absorbed and rice is cooked.  Serve hot.  Delicious!  A family favorite!!

Beef Jeerem Meerem


Beef Jeerem Meerem

Goan Beef Jeerem Meerem

Ingredients

  • 1 Kg. Boneless Beef
  • 2 green chillies
  • 10 cloves garlic
  • 1” pc. Ginger
  • 2 large onions
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 or 2 potatoes, as required (optional)
  • 2 tbsp. Jeerem Meerem powder
  • 1 tbsp. tamarind pulp
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 tbsp. ghee or oil
  • 1 tsp. Salt or to taste
  • ½ tsp sugar (optional)

Method

Clean and cut meat into cubes or slices.  Wash, drain and set aside.  Grind the ginger and garlic to a coarse paste.  Marinate the meat with the 1 tbsp. of the jeerem meerem powder, juice of lemon and salt. Keep aside for one hour atleast.

Slice the onions and tomatoes, slit the green chillies and cut the potatoes into cubes or wedges.  Heat oil I a vessel and fry the onions till light brown.  Add the ginger garlic paste and saute 2 to 3 minutes. Add the tomatoes and fry till soft.  Reduce heat and add the remaining jeerem meerem powder and saute for a miunute.  Add beef and cook on high heat till meat changes color, reduce heat and cook till water evaporates.  Add the tamarind pulp and a cup of hot water, bring to a boil and cook 10 minutes.  Then lower heat and cook another 20  minutes till meat is tender.  Add the green chillies and potatoes and cook further 10 minutes till potatoes are cooked.  Check seasoning.  Add ½ tsp. sugar (optional) Usually this is a dry dish but you can add some hot water if you need to have some gravy and simmer till oil surfaces.  Served with Goan pulao (Aroz) or any bread of your choice.

Goan Vatanayanchi Bhaji Chonya Ros


Apart from being famous for sea-food, one of Goa’s typical breakfast menu is Chonya Ros made with dehydrated white or green peas which are soaked in water and boiled!  Chonya Ros or Vatanayachi Bhaji is made with a coconut based gravy and served with puris for breakfast or poi and for lunch or dinner with rice.  A regular item served on religious festivals which involve fasts abstaining from meat.  Garnishing with freshly cut onion, tomato and coriander leaves is an option but lends an additional boost to the dish.  Although mildly spiced, it is truly lip smacking and delicious.  Enjoy as is without any carbs – for an excellent high protein meal!

Ingredients

  • 2 cups dehydrated yellow or green peas
  • 2 medium onions
  • 1 cup dessicated coconut or dried coconut
  • 4 flakes tamarind
  • ½ tsp. garam masala powder
  • 1 tsp. chilli powder
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste

Pick and wash the peas and soak in water overnight.  Drain the water, replenish with fresh water and cook till tender and soft, may take an hour or more.  At the end of cooking add 1 tsp. salt and mix and simmer for 5 minutes.  You can pressure cook if you prefer.  Meanwhile, heat a pan add a little oil and fry one onion, roughly chopped into pieces, till light brown.  Add the coconut and fry until coconut turns brown.  Grind it with tamarind to a paste.  Take a vessel and add 2 tbsp. oil, when hot add one chopped onion and fry till translucent and soft.  Add chilli powder, garam masala and fry for a minute.  Add the coconut tamarind paste and saute for 2 minutes.  Add the boiled peas with the stock and mix well.  Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes till oil surfaces.  The gravy should be runny.  Remove to a serving bowl and garnish with chopped onion, tomato, lemon and coriander leaves (optional).  Serve with hot crisp puris for breakfast and with rice or bread for lunch or dinner.

Sheviyo Idiyappam String Hoppers


Sheviyo or Shevigo also known as Idiyappam or string hopper is made with ground rice steamed and then pressed into a hand held sev mould or a typical stand alone shevigo equipment.  In Kerala, Tamil Nadu etc Idiyappam is made of rice flour mixed with hot water 2:1 proportion with salt and little oil and kneaded to a soft dough.  The dough balls are then put in the sev mould and pressed onto idli trays and steamed.

I have illustrated the Mangalorean and Goan style of making the Sheviyo i.e. soaking rice, grind to a paste then steaming the batter as a rice cake which is then cut into pieces and pressed as string hoppers with a sev mould.

It can be eaten as a sweet dish for breakfast or a teatime snack garnish with chunn i.e. a jaggery coconut filling or with sweet ros i.e. coconut milk and jaggery mixture.

As a savoury dish serve them with any coconut milk (Roce) curry like chicken or mutton or vegetable stew.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups boiled rice or 1 cup basmati and one cup boiled mixed
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste

Coconut Jaggery (Chunn) filling

  • 1 cup fresh grated coconut
  • ½ cup jaggery grated
  • ¼ tsp. cardamom powder

Coconut Jaggery Milk

  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • ½ cup jaggery or to taste
  • ¼ tsp. cardamom powder

Wash and soak the rice for atleast 6 hours.  Gridn to a smooth paste, add salt, mix and transfer to a cake tin to steam.  Set the steamer and when the water boils place the dish with the rice batter on the steamer and steam for 20 to 25 minutes on medium high.  To check if done, pierce a knife and should come out clean.  Cut the rice cake into large pieces and press the pieces through a sevio or sev (ghatia/chakli) mould using the plate with large holes (if you prefer thinner strands, use the plate with smaller holes) and press like noodles into small circular heaps. 

To make the chunn – heat a pan and add the grated jaggery, add a little water to speed up melting and cook till fully dissolved.  Add the coconut and cook for a minute, then add the cardamom powder and keep aside till required.

To make the sweet milk – Heat the coconut milk till it reaches boiling point and then add the jaggery and simmer till dissolved.  Add cardamom powder, mix and take off heat.

Serve with coconut jaggery filling or sweet coconut milk for breakfast or as teatime snack and with chicken or mutton curry or vegetable stew for lunch or dinner.

Patoleo made in Banana Leaf


I am putting out this post early so that those who don’t have access to turmeric leaves (traditionally used for patoleos/pathoyos/patolis) can use alternatives rather than dampen the spirit of the celebration. True, the delicious flavour and aroma of turmeric leaves will be sacrificed…. I will just imagine the aroma with every bite of the banana leaf patoleos!

Secondly, many skip making patoleos due to time constraints. In that situation, prepare them on the next weekend, freeze them and steam the patoleos on the day required so you can enjoy them freshly steamed.

August 15 (Independence Day in India) happens to coincide with the Assumption of the Virgin Mary (a Holy day of obligation) and Patoleos are a significant item prepared by Goan & Mangalorean catholics on this day. East Indians call it Pan Mori or East Indian leaf cakes. It is also prepared on St, John’s feast (Sao Joao fest) and Konsachem fest (harvest festival). Ediyos, or Pudde steamed in jackfruit leaves were also prepared on August 15, by my mother.

Konkani hindus prepare patoleos on the second Sunday of Sharavan or Nag Panchami and on Hartalika, the eve of Ganesh Chaturthi. Salt-free patoleos, are offered to Goddess Parvati, who the legends say had a strong craving for these sweets during pregnancy.

If Turmeric leaves are not available in your region, be creative and use any leaves (that can be used for cooking) available near you like banana, fig, bay, maple, teak, corn husks, Okra (Lady finger) leaves, etc. Champa flower leaves are also used for steaming food and enjoy your sweet steamed rice cakes. Be creative and make do with what is available and enjoy rather than omitting your traditional foods altogether!

Patoleo

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup basmati rice
  • 1/2 cup boiled rice
  • 1 cup coconut to grind with rice (optional)
  • 1 ½ cups grated coconut
  • 1 cup jaggery, grated
  • 6 cardamoms, powdered
  • Pinch of salt
  • Fresh haldi (saffron) leaves or any edible available leaves

Method

  • Mix the remaining coconut and jaggery and cook till blended. 
  • Add cardamom powder and mix.
  • Set aside to cool. 
  • Wipe the leaves clean.
  • Apply the rice paste evenly over the leaf taking care to spread in the direction of the ridges of the leaf. This gives a subtle ridged effect to the patoleos when cooked.
  • Spread a tablespoon full or more as required of the coconut jaggery filling over the rice paste on one side of the leaf. 
  • Fold the leaf over and prepare all the patolis in similar manner. 
  • If the leaves are too big, cut the patolis in half or quarters so that they fit comfortably into the steamer. 
  • Put some water into the steamer and bring to a boil.
  • Place the tray and put the patoleos into the steamer. 
  • You can even place them one over the other. 
  • Place the lid on the steamer and steam for 20 to 25 minutes till done. 
  • The leaf will change color and the patolis will be firm. 
  • Remove and enjoy!!

For more post on Patholis:

Patoleo

Tumeric Patoleo leaves

Ediyo – Pudde

Beef Croquettes


Beef CROQUETTES

Ingredients

  • 1 Kg. Boneless Beef or Beef mince (substitute with lamb/chicken)
  • 4 medium onions, chopped
  • 12 cloves garlic
  • 2” fresh ginger
  • 1 tsp. turmeric
  • 2 tsp. garam masala powder, or to taste
  • 1 lemon, juice
  • 2 bread slices without edges
  • 1 egg lightly beaten
  • ½ cup freshly chopped coriander leaves
  • 6 to 8 green chillies
  • Salt to taste
  • Rawa/semolina for rolling
  • Oil for frying

Method

  1. Combine ingredients upto turmeric powder, add salt, ½ cup water and cook till almost dry.
  2. Set aside to cool down a bit.
  3. Break the bread into pieces and add to the cooked mince with the garam masala, lemon juice and coriander.
  4. Mix well and grind to a fine paste. 
  5. Add egg and mix well. 
  6. Chill the mixture for half an hour to make it easier to handle.
  7. Shape the mince paste into small cylindrical rolls and roll in rawa to coat. 
  8. Chill another 15 minutes. 
  9. Remove and shallow fry in a pan on medium flame till lightly brown and crisp.
  10. Keep turning the croquettes so that they are evenly browned on all sides. 
  11. Drain on absorbent paper and serve hot.

Goan Pulao Aroz


Goan Pulao – Aroz

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Basmati rice
  • 2 medium onions
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 2 soup cubes
  • 2” stick cinnamon
  • 6 to 8 cloves
  • 5 cardamoms
  • ½ tsp. turmeric
  • 1 tsp. salt, or to taste
  • 2 to 3 tbsp. ghee
  • 4 Cups hot water

Method

  1. Wash rice and soak for at least 15 minutes.
  2. Slice the onions,
  3. chop tomatoes.
  4. Heat a wide thick bottom pan and add the ghee.
  5. When hot add the whole spices and the sliced onions.
  6. Saute till the onions are light brown.
  7. Add the tomatoes and fry till soft.
  8. Add turmeric, soup cubes and salt and fry for a minute till the cubes soften.
  9. Add 4 cups hot water and stir to ensure the soup cubes are completely dissolved.
  10. Then add the rice and stir to mix.
  11. Cover and bring to a boil.
  12. Reduce heat to low and cook till water is completely absorbed.
  13. Stir the rice in between gently, to combine the flavours.
  14. Serve hot.

Goan Roast Beef


Goan Roast Beef

A delicious roast, can be cooked with steak slices or a chunk of beef roasted and then sliced before serving. Serve as a starter or with a main meal. Leftover roast can be made into tasty sandwiches. Yummy…..

Use boneless Lamb instead of beef!

Goan Roast Beef

Ingredients

  • 1 Kg. Beef
  • 3 medium onions, chopped into large pieces.
  • 15 to 18 cloves garlic
  • 1.5”pc. ginger
  • 15 cloves
  • 4 piece cinnamon (1” pc. Each)
  • ¼ tsp. pepper corns
  • 1 tsp. cumin seeds
  • ½ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 4 red chillies
  • 2 tsp. sugar (optional)
  • ¼ cup vinegar, or to taste
  • 2 tbsp. ghee
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste

Method

  1. Grind the spices from garlic to turmeric powder with the vinegar. 
  2. You can add some water to get the spices to move while grinding. 
  3. Transfer the masala to a wide bowl, add salt, mix
  4. Marinate the beef with the ground masala for one hour.
  5. To cook, heat ghee and add the red chillies and onion. 
  6. Saute till the onions are translucent. 
  7. Then add the meat with the masala water and cook till meat is tender and gravy is almost dry. 
  8. Serve hot. 
  9. Leftover beef can be used for sandwiches.

Beef Roulade


Beef Roulade

Goan Beef Roulade

Beef steak stuffed rolls – I am calling this Goan Beef Roulade because this is the spicy version of Beef Olives with typical Goan flavors as it includes Chorizo (Goan sausages) in the stuffing. The Beef Olives I have made earlier are a milder version leaning more towards continental cuisine. Try them, both are delicious in their own right!!

Ingredients

  • 1 kg. Beef steaks, beaten
  • 2 medium chopped onions
  • 2 tbsp. tomato paste
  • 2 to 4 tbsp. oil or ghee
  • Stuffing : Potato, Carrots, Choris (Goan sausages), Bacon, as required

Grind to a smooth paste

  • 10 red chillies
  • 1 ½ “ pc. Ginger
  • 10 cloves garlic
  • 10 cloves
  • 1” cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. cumin seeds
  • ½ tsp. peppercorns
  • ½ tsp. turmeric
  • 4 tbsp. vinegar
  • 1 tsp. salt

Method:

P.S.: Ask the butcher to beat and flatten the steaks well. If not you will need to use a mallet or heavy pestle to beat the steaks to thin them so forming the rolls is easier. 

  1. Wash, drain and marinate the steaks in the ground masala paste for one hour.
  2. Prepare the stuffing. 
  3. Peel, wash and cut one potato in 2” sticks. 
  4. Wash carrot, peel and cut into 2” sticks. 
  5. Remove the Goan sausages from the casings. 
  6. Cut the bacon into 2” strips.  As bacon is not available here I have skipped it.  
  7. Spread the steaks on a board and trim off any excess meat and you need a rectangle piece. 
  8. Reserve the extra meat trimmings 
  9. Place the potato, carrot and sausages on one end of the steak and roll into a compact roll. 
  10. Secure with string or toothpicks. Thus make all the rolls.
  1. Heat a wide pan, add the oil/ghee and fry the chopped onions, w
  2. When they soften and are translucent, add the tomato paste and saute 2 to 3 minutes. 
  3. Place the rolls in a single layer (reserve the excess marinade) and fry 3 to 4 minutes on high till light brown. 
  4. Turn over and cook 20 minutes till the gravy almost dries up. 
  5. Stir well scraping the bottom of the pan to avoid burning the onions. 
  6. Add the excess marinade and some water to rinse the bowl and add to the roulade gravy. 
  7. Also add the leftover potatoes and carrots, if any, chopped finely.
  8. Check and adjust seasoning. 
  9. Cook till meat is tender and gravy is thick and oil surfaces. 
  10. Any rolls that are large in size can be cut into pieces before serving. 
  11. Remove the string before serving. 
  12. Toothpicks may be left as it is as they can be easily removed.  Serve hot.

Xacuti


Xacuti

Xacuti or Xacutti (Konkani: शागोती) is a curry prepared in Goa, India, with complex spicing, including white poppy seeds, sliced or grated coconut and large dried red chilies.[1] It is usually prepared with chicken, lamb, or beef.[2][3] It is also known as chacuti in Portuguese.

Xacuti or Shagoti as is commonly known in Goa has its origin in Harmal (now Arambol) in Pernem Taluka of Goa. Here fisherman in the olden days used to get a fresh catch of fish or a local chicken and prepare a gravy for this dish. The gravy typically used local spices like black pepper (meerya), chilli, turmeric, onion, nutmeg, cinnamon, clove, etc. The hero was a mildly roasted coconut kernel which is finely grated and lightly toasted. – Source Wikipedia:

Chicken Xacuti

A traditional Goan dish, Xacuti (pronounced ‘Sha-kooti’) almost always made with chicken and the complex array of spices used in preparation of this dish makes is wonderfully flavorful and unique.  Xacuti may also be prepared with beef or lamb.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ Kg. Chicken
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. salt

Marination

  • 2” pc. ginger
  • 10 flakes garlic
  • ½ bunch coriander leaves
  • 5 green chillies

Xacuti Masala I

Fry in 1 tsp. oil and grind

  • 1 tsp. oil
  • 3 onions, sliced
  • 3 green chillies
  • 1.5” pc. Ginger
  • 7 garlic flakes
  • 1 large coconut (2 cups grated)
  • ½ bunch coriander leaves

Heat oil in a pan and saute sliced onions, green chillies, ginger, garlic for 3 minutes.  Add grated coconut and saute for another 5 to 7 mns.  Once onions are crispy, keep aside.

Xacuti Masala II

Dry Roast the following

  1. ¼ pc. nutmeg
  2. 2” cinnamon
  3. 3 cardamoms
  4. 1 star anise
  5. 1 tsp. fennel (badishep, saunf)
  6. 1 tsp. black pepper
  7. 1 tbsp. poppy seeds
  8. 1 tbsp. coriander seeds
  9. 8 to 10 kashmiri chillies
  10. ½ tsp. turmeric

Grind all the above together to make the xacuti masala paste.

Xacuti preparation

  • 2 tsp. oil
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 2 green chillies, slit
  • ¼ cup water

Method

  1. Clean, remove skin and cut chicken into pieces. 
  2. Wash and drain. Add salt and turmeric powder to chicken pieces. 
  3. Grind the marination masala and marinate the chicken pieces for half an hour, or overnight if desired.
  4. Heat oil and add onions and green chillies and fry for a minute. 
  5. Add the marinated chicken and saute for 2 minutes. 
  6. Add the xacuti masala and water and cook 30 to 45 minutes or till chicken is tender. 
  7. Serve hot with bread, rice or sannas.
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