Sorpotel and Sannas Combo Traditional Goan and Manglorean festive meal


Sarapatel or Sorpotel, is a dish of Portuguese origin now commonly cooked in the coastal konkan region of India, primarily Goa, Mangalore and East Indians of Mumbai Sarpatel. The former Estado da Índia Portuguesa colony. It is also prepared in northeastern Brazil. The word ‘sarapatel’ literally means confusion, referring to the mish-mash of ingredients which include Pork meat and offal (which includes heart, liver, tongue and even pork blood sometimes). However, in modern-day version, blood is rarely used as now getting the pure blood is slightly difficult. The meat is first parboiled, then diced and sauteed before being cooked in a spicy and vinegary sauce.

The flavourings and spices differ from region to region, for example, some use more vinegar. The size of the pieces also varies, as does cooking technique: some sautee the meat prior to cooking it in the sauce, while others add the diced parboiled meat directly to the sauce.

In Goa and Mangalore, Sorpotel is often accompanied by “sanna” – a spongy, white, and slightly sweet steamed rice and coconut bread. However, it can also be enjoyed with bread, on rice, or in a bun as a sandwich.

Made by African slaves in Brazil, the dish had the tail, ear, intestines, tongue and a hint of blood. It was a filling, rich ode to offal. The pork-loving Portuguese got it to India. What came to India was the version popular from Alentejo region of Portugal, to which the native Goan Christians and East Indians added their own tricks to make it even more interesting. It is this variety that is available today. Source – Wikipedia

Sorpotel

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Kg. Fatty Pork (Belly preferably). If using Pork Liver, use 1 Kg pork and ½ kg liver (I have not used liver as it’s not available here)
  • 2 Large onions, minced
  • 2 tsp. salt or to taste

Grind to a paste with vinegar

  • 1.5 cups vinegar
  • 25 Kashmiri Red chilies
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • 8 to 10 pepper corns
  • 1/2 tsp. Turmeric powder
  • 1 to 2 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 24 flakes garlic
  • 4” pc. Ginger
  • 4” pc. Cinnamon
  • 8 cardamoms
  • 8 cloves

Clean and wash pork (and liver if using) and cut into large pieces.  Heat the pork on  pan and fry for 10 minutes to release the fat, turning the pieces.  Do not add any additional oil. Drain the pork and keep the fat aside. 

Add the pork pieces to a large pan, add salt and enough water to cover the meat and bring to a boil.  Reduce flame and cook 30 minutes till meat is almost done.  Remove from heat, drain and reserve the stock. 

When meat is cool enough to handle, chop into tiny pieces.  If using liver, chop and keep the pork and liver pieces separate.  Do not mix them at this stage. Heat the pan again and add the fat which was set aside.  Add the chopped pork and fry for 10 minutes till light brown.  Drain and remove. Then add the liver pieces and fry 2 to 3 minutes, drain and remove. 

To the same pan, add the minced onion and fry till light brown.  Then add the ground paste and fry 2 to 3 minutes,  add pork and liver pieces and continue frying for 5 minutes.  Add the reserved stock and more water for the gravy and bring to a boil, cover and simmer till meat is tender.  Check seasonings and add salt, vinegar, as required.  Add water to thin down the gravy. 

Enjoy with Sannas, steamed rice, bread, poee or Fugias. For those who don’t eat pork, try this recipe with lamb or chicken liver…… delicious.

Sannas

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Idli Rice
  • 1 cup fresh grated coconut
  • Coconut water or Toddy as required to grind the batter
  • 1 tsp. salt  or to taste
  • ¾ tsp. active dry yeast
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 2 tbsp. luke warm water

Method

Wash and soak rice overnight.  Grind with the coconut using coconut water or toddy, in 2 batches to a smooth paste of pouring consistency (not too thick). 

Bloom the yeast by adding the yeast to a mug, then add the sugar and lukewarm water, stir well, cover and leave aside for 10 minutes.  Once it blooms add to the rice batter and mix and beat the batter well with your hand.  In warm weather the batter should ferment in 2 to 3 hours.  In cold weather will take longer. 

When batter is fermented, set the steamer on heat.  Grease the sanna molds and fill them half way with batter allowing room for the sanna to rise.  Steam for 20 to 25 minutes.  After 20 minutes pierce a thoothpick in the sanna and it should come out clean, if not steam for another 5 minutes and test. 

Transfer the sannas to a water bath to cool slightly.  Demould with a butter knife, back of a spoon or simply pull them away from the edges with your fingers.  Place in a casserole spread with a muslin cloth or a wooden bowl or tray to prevent the warm sannas from sticking to the base. 

Enjoy for breakfast with a dollop of ghee or butter or with Sorpotel, any Pork curry or chicken or mutton curry.

The video is full of tips and steps for the perfect Sorpotel texture and taste and soft and spongy sannas!!

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