Kabuli Pulao


We recently had a birthday lunch for my husband Rudy celebrated with Afghani cuisine.

The menu consisted of Kabuli Pulao, Chicken Korma, Mixed Vegetable Korma, Chicken Kababs, Sweet and Sour onion salad.

Appetisers: Beef Mantu and Potato Bolani.

Dessert: Sheer Korma and Cake.

The Kabuli Pulao was a huge hit, especially with the birthday boy 🙂 Sharing with you all this ‘tried and tested’ recipe. Its absolutely sumptuous and delicious!!

Kabuli Pulao

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: Average
  • Print

Ingredients
1 kg. mutton, cut in large cubes
3 cups Sela rice
4 medium onions, sliced
6 carrots, shredded
4 large tomatoes, sliced
6 cloves
6 cardamoms
3” cinnamon
1 tsp black cumin
1 tsp black pepper powder
3 tsp. garam masala powder
6 cloves garlic, crushed
1 cup raisins (or less if required)
A handful almonds and pistas for garnish (optional)
Salt to taste
Ghee or oil, as required

Method

  1. Wash the rice. Add hot water to cover the rice and soak overnight .
  2. Clean and wash mutton and season with one teaspoon salt.
  3. Take a large pot to cook the pulao. Add 2 tbsp. ghee to the pot, heat and then add the shredded carrots, fry stirring often until cooked, then add the raisins and toss till the raisins are fried and swell up. Remove and set aside.
  4. Then add the meat and fry till brown. Remove.
  5. Add more ghee if required, add the onions and fry to a deep golden brown, then add the sliced tomatoes, cover and cook till the tomatoes dissolve and become a paste.
  6. Add the crushed garlic, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, black cumin, pepper powder and 1 tsp garam masala, toss lightly. Add salt and the browned meat and sufficient water to cook. May use a cooker if desired.
  7. Cook the meat till tender and done. Remove the meat and set aside. Keep aside one cup of the stock.
  8. To the remaining meat stock add the soaked rice, remaining garam masala powder and bring to a boil. Taste and add salt if required.
  9. Lower flame, cover with a tight fitting lid and cook till the rice is done and the stock is absorbed. Switch off the flame.
  10. Open the lid and sprinkle the reserved one cup stock over the rice, then place the cooked meat over the rice in a single layer, top with the fried carrots and raisins and make holes around the rice with the handle of a wooden spoon to allow steam to escape.
  11. Cover the pot with silver foil or a kitchen towel, place the lid and cook on high for 5 minutes, lower flame and cook 5 minutes more. Switch off the flame and allow to sit for 5 to 10 minutes. Serve hot.
  12. To serve gently move aside the meat and carrot raisins. Place the rice on a platter and top with the meat, then carrots and raisins. Garnish with toasted almonds and pistachios if desired.

Goa Restaurant and food review – July-August 2022


Being monsoon season, Shravan and Ganesh, we had to sacrifice some items on the menu as the options available for seafood were far less than expected.  Pomfret, King fish, Oysters, Mussels were not available in most places! Hence all the special fish thalis (we love seafood!) which are either King Fish or Chonok were restricted to only Chonok. Secondly, due to monsoon season we were not able to visit as many restaurants as planned.

1.Copper Leaf, Porvorim – 7th July, 2022

We obviously start our Goa restaurant hopping with Copperleaf and their Special Fish thali is always our first meal.  Although Copperleaf Sp. Thali is the most expensive among all the thalis we have had, we have found the taste, quality and also quantity exceptional, having  most number of items in the thali!  Price Rs. 380/-.

2.Copperleaf, Porvorim – 12th July, 2022

Lunch ‘A la Carte’, Ordered Prawn curry rice, King Fish Rawa fry, Rawa fried Mussels. For take-away ordered, stuffed crab, fish platter and bombil fry.  Took pictures only of mussels and stuffed crab.

3.Soyre, Gauns Vaddo, Mapusa – 24th July, 2022

This restaurant was a revelation and an amazing find.  Happened to google for seafood restaurants in our area (being seafood fans!) and chose Soyre from the lust that came us.  On our first visit we ordered al la carte, Squid butter garlic, Tisreyo sukhe, King Fish recheado, Prawns Rava fry, and Prawn Curry Rice!  My sister who does not eat seafood ordered a Chicken Thali.  The food was amazing, fresh, cooked to a perfect texture and delicious.  The recheado was the best I have ever tasted.  Prices were very reasonable. For 4 persons with drinks the bill was Rs. 2,100/- approx.

Happens to be a fairly new 3 month old restaurant.  Ony hope the restaurant continues to maintain their food quality and taste!

4.Souza Lobo, Calangute – 31st July, 2022

Chose a beachside restaurant to enjoy the beach ambience.  We have often patronized this place.  They do not serve fish thali.  Ordered Sol Kadi golgappas, Stuffed papad with crab, Mackerel Rechado, Chonok Rava fry, Prawn curry rice. 

Food was not that great.  Golgappas were good.  Mackerel rechado was simply some chilli powder smeared on the inside of the mackerel which had no taste at all. Understand the cooks have changed at Souza Lobo so to give them the benefit of the doubt, we hope they are able to rise to their previous standard of food quality and taste soon.

Despite the food we enjoyed the beachside ambience….

5.Turmeric, Porvorim – 3rd August, 2022

Located on the Porvorim main road opposite Mall de Goa.

Planned to try their fish thali but were disappointed as they offered only “A la Carte” although their menu listed fish thali for lunch!

Ordered prawns rava fry, chonok rava fry, king fish curry and rice. Food was ok but the curry had just one slice of king fish shreded into 4 to 6 pieces, ridiculous!  I don’t think I would want to go back to Turmeric.

6.Vinayak Family Restaurant, Assagao – 8th August, 2022

Heard a lot about this restaurant.  Tried their fish thali, as usual the special fish thali.  They had King Fish so ordered one King Fish Thali and One Chonok Thali and what do you think they served as one of the items – Ross omlete, instead of crab curry!!  That was truly disappointing.  Again, I would give them the benefit of the doubt, being off season, etc. etc.  May try them again to see if they have better dishes during season.  Alongwith the thali also tried their Stuffed Mackerel Rechado and Bombil Rawa Fry, which was good. The thalis were priced at King Fish Rs.380 and Chonok Rs. 320.  Mackerel Rs.200 each and Bombil Rawa Fry Rs.430 per plate (3 pieces)

7.Soyre, Gauns Vaddo, Mapusa – 13th August, 2022

Visited Soyre again just to try their Chonok Fish Thali.  Priced at Rs. 250, it was good value but could have been better in taste and quality although the Chonok was fresh, crisp and delicious.

8.Kamalabai, Mapusa – 20th August, 2022

Kamalabai AC section is not opened yet and should be functioning October 2022 onwards.  Their Special Fish thali is always good and love the roti that is always served with the Thali.  The Chonok Thali was priced at Rs.300 which compared to Copperleaf is quite reasonable.

9.Le Jardine, Near Municipal Gardens, Mapusa – 23rd August, 2022

We would have never found or ventured into this restaurant had I Rickshaw driver not recommended it as a good seafood and thali place.  A decent place for family, situated in the heart of Mapusa, bang in front of the Mapusa Municipal Gardens.  They serve Goan Rice Lager, which we tried and was good. Ordered the Chonok Fish Thali and here too were disappointed to find ‘Egg Burji’ instead of crab curry. Anyway need to try them again during “Season”.  Prawns Rava fry was delicious and the mackerel recheado was OK!  Thali is priced at Rs.265, Mackerel Rs. 120 each and Prawns Rs.325.

Clink on the below kinks for further reviews:-

Goa, Restaurant & food review

A Memorable holiday week in Goa

Taikulo ani Bikna Cassia Tora and Jackfruit Seeds Vegetable


Taikulo ani Bikna (Casia Tora & Jackfruit seeds Vegetable)

The early monsoon brings an array of wild foods that are super healthy and delicious. The rain makes wild vegetables grow in abundance alongside roads and in the hilly regions. Taikulo is one of these seasonal, local, monsoon vegetables, available for free, with all of its healthy goodness.  I, however, purchased this lot from the ladies at Mapusa market for Rs.30/-.  The vegetable looks a bit faded as I could not cook it the same day.

Taikulo also called Senna tora or Casia tora (Botanical name) is a wild leafy vegetable that grows along all the roadside and can be plucked straight from the plant and cooked into a simple and nutritious vegetable.  Only the tender leaves are used in cooking. Although the whole plant and roots and seeds are widely used in traditional Indian and South Asian medicine. It is said to have numerous health benefits. From an Ayurvedic stand-point the leaves and seeds of this plant are said to contain acrid, laxative, anthelmintic, ophthalmic, liver tonic, cardio tonic and expectorant properties. Adapted from : Vayuvision

Ingredients

4 to 6 cups Taikulo leaves

3 red chillies

6 flakes garlic

1 medium onion

½ tsp. Turmeric powder

½ cup coconut

10 to 12 jackfruit seeds (pre-boiled)

2 tbsp. oil

½ tsp. salt or to taste

Remove the tender leaves from the stems and discard the thick stems. Wash the taikulo leaves well, add some salt and soak in salted water for 15 minutes.  Drain and chop finely.  Slice the onion, crush the garlic and break the chillies into bits.  Heat the oil, add the red chillies, garlic and onion.  When onion is translucent, add 1/2 tsp. turmeric and mix.  Avoided excessive spices to get optimum benefit from the vegetable. Then add taikulo leaves, salt, some water and cook for 15 to 20 minutes till tender.  Add the boiled jackfruit seeds, cut in half and the coconut, mix and cook 5 minutes. Remove from heat and serve as an accompaniment with any main meal.

N.B.: When jackfruit is in season, collect the seeds and dry they for a day or two which makes the skin a bit loose and becomes easier to peel. Then, wash and boil jackfruit seeds, cool and store in zip lock bags in the freezer. 

Spiny Gourd Kantola


Spiny Gourd, Kantola

Spiny Gourd (Phagil) is a spiky green vegetable. It is also known as kantola, kakora, kakrol, spine gourd, teasle gourd etc. Available during the monsoon season this vegetable is not only super tasty but also provides a whole lot of health benefits. The appearance (and name) of the vegetable is quite misleading.  Looks spiny but when cooked is so tender, it rather took me by surprise.  Turned out to be delicious!

Seasonal vegetables are great if you are looking for regular intake of nutrition and still go easy on your pocket. The best part of including seasonal fruits and vegetables in your diet is their inherent ability to fight seasonal illnesses and flu.

Ingredients

½ Kg. Spiny Gourd

1 tsp. chilli powder or to taste

½ tsp. turmeric

1 lemon, juice (optional)

1 tsp.salt or to taste

2 tbsp. oil

Wash the kantola and chop the ends and slice.  Hard seeds, if any may be removed or can be discarded while eating.  Sprinkle the chilli and turmeric powders and salt and lemon juice and mix well.  Set aside for 15 minutes.  Fry the slices and stir fry, till cooked.  The appearance (and name) of the vegetable is quite misleading.  Looks spiny but when cooked is so tender, it rather took me by surprise.  Turned out to be delicious!

Guacamole


Guacamole

Avocados may have a range of health benefits, including improving digestion, decreasing the risk of depression, and protecting against cancer.  Avocados provide a substantial amount of monounsaturated fatty acids and are rich in many vitamins and minerals. Incorporating them into a varied, healthy diet can provide a number of benefits.

Avocados are a source of vitamins C, E, K, and B6, as well as riboflavin, niacin, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, and potassium. They also provide lutein, beta carotene, and omega-3 fatty acids.

Avocados contain high levels of healthy, beneficial fats, which can help a person feel fuller between meals. Eating fat slows the breakdown of carbohydrates, which helps keep blood sugar levels stable.

Risks: Avocado has a high fat content, so adding too many to the diet might lead to unintended weight gain.

Avocados also contain vitamin K, which can affect how blood thinners work.

It is important for people taking blood thinners, such as warfarin (Coumadin), to keep their vitamin K levels constant. For this reason, it is not a good idea to suddenly eat more or fewer foods containing vitamin K, which plays an important role in blood clotting.  – Source : Medical News Today

Ingredients

1 large or 2 medium Ripe Avocados

1 small tomato, deseeded & chopped

1 lemon, juice or to taste

½ tsp. salt or to taste

½ of small onion

1 green chilli, deseeded or ½ jalapeno

1 clove garlic, minced, optional

1 tbsp. fresh coriander leaves/cilantro, chopped

Cut the Avocado, remove the seed and scoop out the flesh and transfer to a mixing bowl.  Add the ingredients from tomato to garlic and mix well.  Garnish with chopped coriander.  Spread thickly on toasted Poee, Sour dough bread or with tortilla chips and serve immediately as stater or appetiser or as a snack!

How to cean and cook Terem Leaves Alun Leaves and Alsande curry


How to clean and cook Terem leaves

Also called Taro, Alu, Colocassia, Pathra leaves are high in nutrition and Iron rich.  Available in plenty in the monsoon, they grow abundantly in and around gardens and fields and along the roadside where there is plenty of greenery.  However it is only the leaves that have red/purple stems that are edible and those that have green stems cannot be consumed.

Terem/Taro/Alu leaves and Alssone Curry

Ingredients

15 Terem leaves and 3 to 4 stems

1 cup Alsande/Alsone beans (or 15 jackfruit seeds or 1 cup Black eyed beans)

1 cup fresh grated coconut

1 tsp. cumin seeds

1 tsp. mustard seeds

1 tsp. turmeric powder

1” pc cinnamon stick

2 cloves

2 red chillies

5 flakes garlic

1 medium onion

2 medium tomatoes

8 Kokum petals

1 tsp. Salt or to taste

2 tbps. Coconut oil

Wash the leaves well and wash and peel the stems.  Chop finely.  Apply some oil on your hands or wear gloves to avoid the itchy feeling on your hands post cleaning.  Slice the onion and tomatoes and keep aside. Wash and boil the alsone beans till tender.  Add salt and then add the chopped terem leaves and stem and cook 10 minutes.  Meanwhile, dry roast the fresh coconut and grind with the cumin, mustard, chillies, garlic, turmeric cinnamon and cloves to a smooth paste.  Take another vessel and when hot, add the oil and fry the sliced onion till light brown.  Then add the tomatoes and when soft add the ground masala paste and sautee for 3 minutes.  Add the kokum petals. Then add the boiled alsone and terem leaves to the gravy alongwith water from the rinsed masala jar and additional water if thinner gravy is required.  Adjust seasoning and cook 15 minutes till oil surfaces.  Remove to a serving dish and serve hot with rice or poee or any bread for a sumptuous and healthy local and seasonal meal, protein and iron rich!!

Water Chestnuts How to consume tender water chestnuts


Water Chestnuts – how to consume them

NUTRITION Evidence Based 5 Surprising Benefits of Water Chestnuts (Plus How to Use Them) Written by Ryan Raman, MS, RD on April 20, 2018

Despite being called chestnuts, water chestnuts are not nuts at all. They are aquatic tuber vegetables that grow in marshes, ponds, paddy fields and shallow lakes. Water chestnuts are native to Southeast Asia, Southern China, Taiwan, Australia, Africa and many islands in the Indian and Pacific oceans. They are harvested when the corm, or bulb, turns a dark brown color. They have a crisp, white flesh that can be enjoyed raw or cooked and are a common addition to Asian dishes such as stir-fries, chop suey, curries and salads Water chestnuts are very nutritious and contain high amounts of fiber, potassium, manganese, copper, vitamin B6 and riboflavin. Most of their calories come from carbs. Water chestnuts are a great source of the antioxidants ferulic acid, gallocatechin gallate, epicatechin gallate and catechin gallate. These antioxidants can help the body combat oxidative stress, which is linked to many chronic diseases. Also known as Water Caltrop, Paniphal, Singhara

Eaten raw

Wash, peel and eat raw. Delicious, crunchy.

Boiled

Wash, cut off the stems and boil 15 minutes. Drain, cool, peel and eat as a delightful healthy nutritious snack

Sauteed Water chestnuts

1 medium onion, chopped ½ tsp. chilli powder 4 flakes garlic, chopped, 1” pc ginger, copped 1 tbsp. coriander leaves, chopped ½ tsp. salt 1 tbsp. lemon juice Optional: 1 tbsp. green chutney sauce, 1 tbsp. sweet chutney sauce or Schezwan sauce or combination of soy sauce and tomato ketchup 1 tbsp. each. Etc.

Wash and peel the water chestnuts and immerse in water till required. Add 1 tbsp. oil to a pan and stir fry for 10 minutes. Drain and remove. Add 1 tbsp. oil to the pan and sautee the chopped ginger garlic for a minute, then add the chopped onion and sautee till saoft. Add the chilli powder, green chutney and sweet chutney and salt and 2 t 3 tbsp. water and add the chestnuts and cook till the moisture dries and the sauce thickens. Sqyeeze over the lemon and garnish with coriander leaves. Serve as an accompaniment with any main meal or as a starter! Absolutely delicious!!

How to steam cook Sannas in an Oven


Check out the recipe for Sorpotel and Sannas Combo below:-

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How to effectively cook Dry Prawns and Lady Fingers in a Curry Mangalorean & Goan Style Curry


Dried shrimp are shrimp that have been sun-dried and shrunk to a thumbnail size. They are used in many East Asian, Southeast Asian and South Asian cuisines, imparting a unique umami taste.] A handful of shrimp is generally used for dishes. The flavors of this ingredient are released when allowed to simmer. Source: Wikipedia

Dried Shrimp and Lady Finger Curry with Sola (Dried mango)

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Dry Prawns (Before cleaning)
  • 20 to 25 Lady Fingers
  • 8 flakes dried mango (Sola)
  • 1 small onion, sliced
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt or to taste
  • 2 tbsp. coconut oil

Grind to a paste

  • 4 red Kashmiri chilies
  • 6 small round chilies (from Goa)
  • 3 tbsp. coconut powder
  • 1 tbsp. coriander seeds
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper corns
  • 1/4 tsp. turmeric powder
  • 4 flakes garlic
  • 1 small onion
  • 4 to 5 flakes tamarind (small ball)

Roast prawns gently on medium low flame till aromatic and crisp. Becpmes easier to clean when crisp, the heads etc. fall off easily. Leave aside to cool. Prepare the masala ingredients and grind to a smooth paste using some water.

Wash the lady fingers and drain. Cut off the heads and tails and cut each slantwise into 2 to 3 pieces depending on the length of the lady finger. Cutting slantwise gives you a better view of the inside of the lady ifnger which can be sometimes infested with worms.

When the prawns are cool, clean them by removing the head, tail and legs and immerse in water for 10 minutes to soften. Soak the mango sola in water in a cup till required.

Slice the onion and fryin 2 tbsp. oil till light brown. Squeeze out the water (discard the waer) from the prawns and add to the onion. Remove the dried mango from the water (reserve the water) and add to the prawns and saute for 2 minutes. Add the masala paste, sufficient water for the curry, salt and bring to a boil. Then add the lady fingers, adjust the consisency of the curry and cook 10 minutes. Reduce flame when it starts boiling. After 10 minutes check if the vegetable is cooked, if not simmer further 5 minutes. Remove from eat when curry appears glossy and fat surfaces. Serve hot with rice for a delicious, nutritious and satisfying meal.

Galmbi Chutney Dry Prawn Chutney


Typical mangalorean dry prawn chutney, served as an accompaniment at any main meal. Delicious with simple dal rice or with pez!

  • Ingredients
  • 1 cup dry prawns, cleaned with head, tail and legs removed
  • 2 cups fresh grated coconut
  • 4 green chillies
  • 4 flakes garlic (reduce to taste)
  • 1/2 ” pc. ginger
  • 4 tpo 5 sprigs coriander leaves
  • 1 small lemon sized ball tamarind
  • 1 small onion

Roast the dry prawns on a heated pan on medium low flame till aromatic and crisp. Leave aside to cool.

Grind the chutney ingredients to a coarse almost dry paste, I like to add 2 tbsp. of the prawns to the grinder alongwith the chutney ingredients. Otherwise prawns are not be be ground. Mix prawns with the chutney wiht your hands, squeezing and crushing the prawns somewhat. Serve as an accompaniment with any main meal. Excellent with a simple meal of dal rice or with pez!!

Drumstick Moringa Fruit Pods How to clean, cook and eat them in a simple yet delicious vegetable


Drumstick Vegetable, Sangho Tel Piyav

The healthy, nutritious drumstick (moringa) (sangho) fruit pods

Drumstick pods and leaves are a storehouse of essential nutrients, whereas the leaves are the most nutrient part of the plant and one of the finest sources of calcium, iron, zinc, selenium and magnesium.  Fresh pods and seeds are a great source of oleic acid, a healthy fatty acid which is known to promote heart health. Moringa leaves is unique among all the greens as it is heaped with a good amount of protein about 9.8 gram of protein per 100 grams. Dry powdered leaves are an amazing source of good quality essential amino acids.

The rich culinary tradition of our country has helped us to relish and taste several types of vegetables and fruits thereby derive out the umpteen health benefits. One such amazing vegetable that is greatly valued and earns our interest is drumstick or moringa oleifera.

Moringa obtains its name from the Tamil word, murungai, denotes twisted pod. This humble vegetable is used extensively in Indian culinary dishes for more than a hundred years. Be it delectable sambhar or avail, or any meat curry, soups, pickles etc., drumstick renders its unique flavour to the dishes.

Source: Netmeds.com

Ingredients

  • 6 Drumsticks
  • 5 flakes garlic
  • 1 medium onion
  • 2 tbs. coconut oil
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • Salt to taste
  • 4 tbsp. fresh coconut

Method

Cut the head and tail of the drumstick and cut into 2 to 4” segments, removing the skin as far as possible keeping the segment intact ensue it does not disintegrate. Discard the head, tail and the skin.  Wash and drain the cleaned drumstick pieces.  Slice the onion and peel and crush the garlic. Heat a pan, add 2 tbsp. coconut oil, when hot add 1 tsp. mustard seed and allow to pop, then add crushed garlic flakes. Saute for a minute and add the sliced onion and fry thill soft and translucent.  Add the drumsticks and toss to cost with oil.  Add a cup of water, ½ tsp. salt or to taste and bring to a boil.  Mix, cover and cook 10 minutes.  Stir in between.  When done, add the coconut, mix well and simmer 5 minutes.  Take off flame and serve hot as a side with any main meal.  To eat, hold the drumstick piece firmly with your teeth and pull with your fingers while extracting and consuming the pulp and the seeds inside the pod.  Chew the skin, if you wish, and discard.  Simply delicious!  The skin should not be ingested, only the pulp and tender seeds inside the pod.

Moringa Leaves Drumstick Leaves Stir Fry Vegetable


The new superfood – Moringa leaves, healthy, nutritious, excellent for gut health and for diabetics.  My mother never had to buy these leaves, they were always available in the home garden or the neighbourhood.  Thankfully these are now available worldwide at Asian stores, albeit at a price!

Ingredients

  • 2 Bunches Drumstick Leaves
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • 2 tbsp. coconut oil

Roast and grind to a coarse paste

  • 1 medium onion chopped
  • 2 flakes garlic
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric powder
  • 4 dry red chilies
  • ½ cup fresh or dessicaed coconut
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 to 2 tbsp. coconut oil

Method

Separate the leaves from the stems of the drumsticks and remove as much of the stems as possible although the small tender stems may be retained.  Soak in plenty of water for 10 minutes and rinse thoroughly changing the water atleast twice so that any dust etc. can come off.  Drain and set aside.

Drumstick Leaves Moringa Leaves Stir Fry vegetable

The new superfood – Moringa leaves, healthy, nutritious, excellent for gut health and for diabetics.  My mother never had to buy these leaves, they were always available in the home garden or the neighbourhood.  Thankfully these are now available worldwide at Asian stores, albeit at a price!

Ingredients

2 Bunches Drumstick Leaves

1 medium onion

1 tsp. mustard seeds

2 tbsp. coconut oil

Roast and grind to a coarse paste

1 medium onion chopped

2 flakes garlic

¼ tsp. turmeric powder

4 dry red chilies

½ cup fresh or dessicaed coconut

Salt to taste

1 to 2 tbsp. coconut oil

Method

Separate the leaves from the stems of the drumsticks and remove as much of the stems as possible although the small tender stems may be retained.  Soak in plenty of water for 10 minutes and rinse thoroughly changing the water atleast twice so that any dust etc. can come off.  Drain and set aside.

Heat a pan and add oil.  When hot add the red chilies, garlic and onion.  When light brown add the coconut, turmeric powder and salt and saute for 2 minutes till light brown and you get a nice roasted aroma.  Set aside to cool. Then grind to a coarse paste.

Slice the remaining onion.  Heat a pan and add oil, when hot add the mustard seeds, when they pop add the sliced onion and fry till translucent and soft.  Add the ground masala and saute 2 to 3 minutes adding the rinsed water from the jar. Add the drained drumstick leaves, mix and stir fry for 10 minutes.  Remove to a serving dish and serve hot.  The vegetable will have a slight crunch to it and a slight bitter taste so is very healthy and excellent for diabetics, is very nutritious and good for gut health due to it’s fibre content.  Some may want the leaves to be more tender, in this case add ¼ cup water and cook further 5 minutes.  Serve hot. 

Sorpotel and Sannas Combo Traditional Goan and Manglorean festive meal


Sarapatel or Sorpotel, is a dish of Portuguese origin now commonly cooked in the coastal konkan region of India, primarily Goa, Mangalore and East Indians of Mumbai Sarpatel. The former Estado da Índia Portuguesa colony. It is also prepared in northeastern Brazil. The word ‘sarapatel’ literally means confusion, referring to the mish-mash of ingredients which include Pork meat and offal (which includes heart, liver, tongue and even pork blood sometimes). However, in modern-day version, blood is rarely used as now getting the pure blood is slightly difficult. The meat is first parboiled, then diced and sauteed before being cooked in a spicy and vinegary sauce.

The flavourings and spices differ from region to region, for example, some use more vinegar. The size of the pieces also varies, as does cooking technique: some sautee the meat prior to cooking it in the sauce, while others add the diced parboiled meat directly to the sauce.

In Goa and Mangalore, Sorpotel is often accompanied by “sanna” – a spongy, white, and slightly sweet steamed rice and coconut bread. However, it can also be enjoyed with bread, on rice, or in a bun as a sandwich.

Made by African slaves in Brazil, the dish had the tail, ear, intestines, tongue and a hint of blood. It was a filling, rich ode to offal. The pork-loving Portuguese got it to India. What came to India was the version popular from Alentejo region of Portugal, to which the native Goan Christians and East Indians added their own tricks to make it even more interesting. It is this variety that is available today. Source – Wikipedia

Sorpotel

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Kg. Fatty Pork (Belly preferably). If using Pork Liver, use 1 Kg pork and ½ kg liver (I have not used liver as it’s not available here)
  • 2 Large onions, minced
  • 2 tsp. salt or to taste

Grind to a paste with vinegar

  • 1.5 cups vinegar
  • 25 Kashmiri Red chilies
  • 1 tsp. mustard seeds
  • 8 to 10 pepper corns
  • 1/2 tsp. Turmeric powder
  • 1 to 2 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 24 flakes garlic
  • 4” pc. Ginger
  • 4” pc. Cinnamon
  • 8 cardamoms
  • 8 cloves

Clean and wash pork (and liver if using) and cut into large pieces.  Heat the pork on  pan and fry for 10 minutes to release the fat, turning the pieces.  Do not add any additional oil. Drain the pork and keep the fat aside. 

Add the pork pieces to a large pan, add salt and enough water to cover the meat and bring to a boil.  Reduce flame and cook 30 minutes till meat is almost done.  Remove from heat, drain and reserve the stock. 

When meat is cool enough to handle, chop into tiny pieces.  If using liver, chop and keep the pork and liver pieces separate.  Do not mix them at this stage. Heat the pan again and add the fat which was set aside.  Add the chopped pork and fry for 10 minutes till light brown.  Drain and remove. Then add the liver pieces and fry 2 to 3 minutes, drain and remove. 

To the same pan, add the minced onion and fry till light brown.  Then add the ground paste and fry 2 to 3 minutes,  add pork and liver pieces and continue frying for 5 minutes.  Add the reserved stock and more water for the gravy and bring to a boil, cover and simmer till meat is tender.  Check seasonings and add salt, vinegar, as required.  Add water to thin down the gravy. 

Enjoy with Sannas, steamed rice, bread, poee or Fugias. For those who don’t eat pork, try this recipe with lamb or chicken liver…… delicious.

Sannas

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Idli Rice
  • 1 cup fresh grated coconut
  • Coconut water or Toddy as required to grind the batter
  • 1 tsp. salt  or to taste
  • ¾ tsp. active dry yeast
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 2 tbsp. luke warm water

Method

Wash and soak rice overnight.  Grind with the coconut using coconut water or toddy, in 2 batches to a smooth paste of pouring consistency (not too thick). 

Bloom the yeast by adding the yeast to a mug, then add the sugar and lukewarm water, stir well, cover and leave aside for 10 minutes.  Once it blooms add to the rice batter and mix and beat the batter well with your hand.  In warm weather the batter should ferment in 2 to 3 hours.  In cold weather will take longer. 

When batter is fermented, set the steamer on heat.  Grease the sanna molds and fill them half way with batter allowing room for the sanna to rise.  Steam for 20 to 25 minutes.  After 20 minutes pierce a thoothpick in the sanna and it should come out clean, if not steam for another 5 minutes and test. 

Transfer the sannas to a water bath to cool slightly.  Demould with a butter knife, back of a spoon or simply pull them away from the edges with your fingers.  Place in a casserole spread with a muslin cloth or a wooden bowl or tray to prevent the warm sannas from sticking to the base. 

Enjoy for breakfast with a dollop of ghee or butter or with Sorpotel, any Pork curry or chicken or mutton curry.

The video is full of tips and steps for the perfect Sorpotel texture and taste and soft and spongy sannas!!

If you don’t have a steamer, cook your Sannas in an Oven. Check out the video below.

Vaal Usal


Vaal Usal Valache Usal Dalimbi Usal

Sprouted Vaal, Butterbeans, Lima Beans, field beans

Lima beans provide more protein per serving than any other type of beans and are rich in vitamins & minerals.  Good source of fibre alongwith micronutrients like manganese, copper and  magnesium – source: healthline

Ingredients

  • 2 cup Sprouted and Peeled Vaal beans
  • 3 medium onions, chopped
  • 1 sprig curry leaves
  • ¼ tsp. asafoetida
  • 1 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp. ginger garlic paste
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. chilli powder
  • ½ tsp. turmeric
  • 2 tsp. jaggery
  • 6 Kokum petals
  • ½ cup coriander leaves, chopped
  • 2 tbsp. oil

Soak the Vaal beans for 12 to 15 hours.  Drain the water, rinse and leave in the bowl to sprout for 24 hrs.

Sprinkle water or cover the beans and drain 2 or 3 times so that the beans stay moist to aid sprouting. In most markets in India, sprouted beans are readily available.

Once sprouted, peel and discard the skin.  Keep immersed in water whilst peeling which makes it easier for the peels to slip off.  Put the peeled beans in a bowl of water.  Soak the kokum in a little water.

Heat  a vessel, add oil.  When hot, add the cumin seed, asafoetida and curry leaves.  Stir and add ginger garlic paste, saute for a minute and add the chopped onions and fry till translucent.  Add the drained beans, salt and a cup of water.  Cook for 10 to 15 minutes till tender.  Then add, chilli powder, turmeric, kokum with the water and cook futher 5 minutes.  Substitute with 1 tbsp.  tamarind pulp if kokum not available. Then add the jaggery and coriander leaves.  Cook 2 minutes, adjust seasoning and consistency of gravy and take off flame.  Serve hot with rice for lunch or dinner or any bread of your choice for breakfast!  Delicious, spicy, tangy with a hint of sweetness makes this Usual an all time favorite!

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